Comments by AnWulf

  • Ughten is that "restless hour before the dawn" ... Forsyth, Horologicon, The NED (the forerunner of the OED) calls it "the part of the night immediately before daybreak ..."

    It's from ME ughten ‘the time of twilight before dawn’, from OE ūht ‘the time right before daybreak’ (Bosworth-Toller). Likely from an objectiv case as in ‘on uhtan’.

    As for how it is said, the 'gh' is silent as in night, sight, bight, light but which shows that the fore-vowel is long thus it would likely be said as ooten or yooten. Yes, the 'gh' might hav once been said like the 'ch' in 'loch' or German 'ich' but not anymore. However, Ormulum wrote 'uhhtenn'. The two h's make the fore-vowel short ... likely not short like in 'ug' but short like 'oohten' rather than 'yooten'.

    March 7, 2014

  • "Only communist true believers would go to Cuba on holiday if the entire capital were still a vast ruinscape." ... The Once Great City of Havana http://www.worldaffairsjournal.org/blog/michael-j-totten/once-great-city-havana

    December 5, 2013

  • throck - (noun) 1. plowhead 2. table
    (verb) - to put the plow to the plowhead

    November 26, 2013

  • spuzz, n. 1. Mental energy, an aggressive in tellect. 2. Stamina, force, spice.
    spuzzard, n. An active, forceful thinker; someone with lots of vim
    spuzzy, a. 1. Highly seasoned. Charged with brain-electricity; vim; spicey

    Theodore Roosevelt and Kaiser Wilhelm have spuzz.
    Spuzz in acting, in writing, or in business is what brings in the money.
    Spuzz welcomes competition; it is always ready for the fray.
    You can t down the spuzzard; he is elastic, and bounces up after every failure.
    The spuzzard is the girl who could "just die dancing" She answers her letters the day they are received.
    The farmer with no spuzz to him can never lift the mortgage; but the spuzzy guy down the road is educating his sons to be doctors and lawyers.
    Spuzz is that getaheadness. The zip, tang, and racehorse keenness that has for its motto: Do it now!

    November 14, 2013

  • ferth – I. the soul, spirit, mind; II. life ... from OE ferþ.

    May 25, 2013

  • holen ... past participle of hele, 'to cover, hide, conceal'.

    May 16, 2013

  • heled ... hele'd... hele + ed ... past tense of hele to cover, conceal, hide ... also hole and holen

    May 16, 2013

  • atell — to reckon up, count; tell, enumerate; explain, interpret from ME atellen, from OE atellan.

    May 10, 2013

  • Kern - to grow into fruit; ripen, mature

    Maÿ flow'rs do grow vor June to burn,
    An' milk-white blooth o' trees do kern,
    — RIVERS DON'T GI'E OUT

    May 9, 2013

  • Hidelock, Hidlock, a hiding place. "He is in hidelock." He is absconded.

    While I, a-chucklèn at the joke,
    A-slided down, to run, min,
    To hidelock, had a-left the vo'k
    As bad as na'r a tun, min.
    — WHAT DICK AN' I DID.

    May 8, 2013

  • hazen - to forebode

    May 8, 2013

  • ... though they would not be deemed trustworthy if they were in some softer or more brittle or bendsome substance; ... 1861, MacMillan's Magazine

    After all why should not our movement be a cause of their change of shape according to definite laws just as well as our squeezing them with our fingers if they chance to be made of some bendsome material? ... 1914, Charlie Dunbar Broad, Perception, Physics, and Reality

    May 7, 2013

  • acover - to recover, regain; to remedy; to revive; ~ up, to rise again. ... From ME acoveren, from OE acofrian.

    May 6, 2013

  • acover - to recover, regain; to remedy; to revive; ~ up, to rise again. ... From ME acoveren, from OE acofrian.

    April 24, 2013

  • fisselig - flustered into incompetence because a critical person is watching ... from German fisselig: thin, fine or requiring dexterity; awkward, clumsy, fiddly

    April 22, 2013

  • • pride or gratification, huru at the achievements of one's children.
    • congratulations

    ORIGIN early 20th cent.: from Yiddish nakhes, from Hebrew naḥaṯ ‘contentment’

    April 22, 2013

  • angbreast - asthma, a difficulty of breathing, breast-anguish from OE angbreost

    April 21, 2013

  • fustilugs - a ponderous clumsy person; huru : a fat and slovenly woman ... fusty (Old French fust “cask”+y) + lugs, pl. of lug (leg) ... in other words, chubby legs ... legs as thick as a cask.

    a vast virago, or an ugly tit, a slug, a fat fustilugs, a trusse, a long lean rawbone, a skeleton
    – John Keats, letter to George Keats, Sept. 1819

    April 17, 2013

  • overspire - to tower over

    April 15, 2013

  • ***A mercenary who would often dress in all black and blacken his face. From Dutch swartrutter or swartruiter (black rider) mightly from German schwarze rotte (black gang).

    Swartrutters were groups of men who wore black clothes and blackened their faces. These gangs were a threatening presence in the Netherlands during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. — "African American Slave Narratives: An Anthology" , Sterling Lecater Bland, ‎2001

    April 13, 2013

  • mikel - mickle, great, intense, much, many, huge, enormous

    April 13, 2013

  • sitzfleisch - patience, endurance, staying power, persistence, determination, stedfastness, tholemod ... also someone's bottom.

    April 13, 2013

  • sitzfleisch - patience, endurance, staying power, persistence, determination, steadfastness, tholemod ... also someone's bottom.

    April 12, 2013

  • From OE agiefan — to pay, repay, restore, return; giv, impart, deliver, giv up, giv back, yield, relinquish

    April 12, 2013

  • OE todal — partition, division, separation; difference, distinction, discretion; dispersion: 'comma', dividing point, clause, section, period.

    April 12, 2013

  • Right dauntingly she answered him,
    “Begone ye hallanshaker.
    Jog on your gate ye blether skyte,
    my name is Maggie Lauder”.
    — Maggie Lauder

    April 10, 2013

  • Could also be from eath (easy) ... OE eaþ.

    April 10, 2013

  • Dogberry – an ignorant, self-important official
    (From the name of a foolish constable in Shakespeare's "Much Ado about Nothing".)

    April 10, 2013

  • dogberry – an ignorant, self-important official
    (From the name of a foolish constable in Shakespeare's "Much Ado about Nothing".)

    April 10, 2013

  • gandermooner – A husband who strays each month, during the "time of month" when his wife is "unavailable".

    From the Dict. of Obsolete English:
    Gander, v. To ramble about without object.
    Gandermonth, s. The month in which a man's wife is confined. Gandermooner, one who acts the gallant at that season. To go a gandering, to gallant during this season.

    April 10, 2013

  • The oldest Germanic word for "wedding" is represented by Old English brydlop (also brydhlop) (liken Old High German bruthlauft, Old Norse bruðhlaup), literally "bride run," the conducting of the woman to her new home. Bride can also mean wedding ... It could also mean the newly wed twosome going to their new home.

    In early kennings ("bride-banquet") the brýd could as well mean "wedding" as "the marrying woman", and indeed sometimes ("bridal couple") it cannot to be only about the woman. At first brýd was a broader term which "had the force of ‘bridal, wedding’ (the primitive marriage being essentially the acquisition of a bride)". (OED) Thus the brýdguma (bridegroom) was not 'the bride's man'; he was 'the wedding man'.

    April 10, 2013

  • A gamp is a cloth that contains a set of color stripes in the warp that are crossed by a set of color stripes in the weft.

    "the colorful gamp that has matching warp and weft will be hemmed for a table runner"

    April 9, 2013

  • phryne - a spectacular legal stunt

    Ellsworth Toohey wrote in his column: "Mr. Roark pulled a Phryne in court and didn't get away with it."
    – Ayn Rand, The Fountainhead, ch. XIII

    April 6, 2013

  • alay from OE alecgan

    1. To mix; to reduce or lower by mixing;
    2. To place, lay down, throw down, suppress, lay aside, cease from, lay low; depress; to apply.

    He must beware of alle such thinges as may chafe him: if he drinketh wine let him alaye it, or let it be soure.
    — Hulibush's Homish Apothecary, fol. 41.

    Take creme of almondes, and alay hit with flour of rys, ...
    - Warner, Antiq. Culin., p. 83.

    Take almandes blanched, grynd hem, and alay hem up with the same broth. — Forme of Cury, p.10.

    April 5, 2013

  • Geflügelte Worte : der Zitatenschatz des deutschen Volkes. Gesammelt und
    erläutert ... Winged Words: The famous quotes of the German folk. Gather'd and
    explained.

    April 5, 2013

  • pursed or puckered lips

    April 3, 2013

  • to clear ... The fog begins to shrepe yonder.

    Said to be from ON skreppa.

    April 2, 2013

  • cabobble - To mystify, puzzle, or confuse.

    Eyeing her guest with humor, she said, “My friend, I see you are in that state where thoughts cabobble you, but they need not. … " — "Time Slipping", Jeanne Mcelvaney, 2012, p211

    April 2, 2013

  • noun Astronomy
    a patch of faint nebulous light sometimes seen in the night sky opposit the position of the sun. It is thought to be the image of the sun reflected from gas and dust outside the atmosphere.

    April 2, 2013

  • Unsoulclogged – Not weighed down in spirit.

    April 1, 2013

  • shenship - disgrace

    April 1, 2013

  • spidireen — an imaginary vessel. If a sailor doesn't want to tell what ship he belongs to, he can say, "The spidireen frigate with nine decks."

    April 1, 2013

  • deceit, deception, deceptful

    Be not afraid and be not sullen sick,” she went on, “for though the seed of battle be sewn by vootery of the darkest nature, in the end it is ours who will reap the victory … ” — "Shaturanga: The Story of Onusy", Brian Snelson, p129; 2003

    April 1, 2013

  • emotion, stir, excitement ... And Jim Sutherland rushed up in another bearm, telling Uncle, "Cross over." ... Leslie Dykstra, "Puryear's Hornpipe"

    March 28, 2013

  • Powerful, vigorous, firm, durable ... "Trumlic you look and gay!" --Maristan Chapman, "The Happy Mountain"

    March 28, 2013

  • To spread out, overshadow, cover over ... "The moving light of morning passed down the slope and overbraedened the side of Cragg Hill southward of Lowes' cabin." --Maristan Chapman, The Happy Mountain

    March 28, 2013

  • Likely from a shortening of riffle.

    March 24, 2013

  • Also boon-work

    February 28, 2013

  • For gaff meaning loud talk or harsh treatment: Perhaps from Old English gafsprǣc (“buffoonery, scurrility; blasphemous or ribald speech”), from Old English gaf (“base, vile, lewd”) + Old English sprǣc (“language, speech, talk”)

    From Edgar Rice Burrows, Beyond Thirty (aka The Lost Continent):
    "Numbers one, two, and five engines have broken down, sir," he called. "Shall we force the remaining three?"
    "We can do nothing else," I bellowed into the transmitter.
    "They won't stand the gaff, sir," he returned.
    "Can you suggest a better plan?" I asked.
    "No, sir," he replied.
    "Then give them the gaff, lieutenant," I shouted back, and hung up the receiver.

    August 31, 2012

  • Avenging, revenge

    April 7, 2012

  • From OE ricedom: power, rule, dominion: Ðín rícedóm ofer ús ríxie ... usually translated as: 'thy kingdom come' (word for word: Thy rikedom over us govern ...)

    (O. Sax. ríki-dóm power : O. Frs. ríke-dóm : O. H. Ger. ríhhi-tuom imperium; divitiae : Icel. rík-dómr power; wealth.)

    April 6, 2012

  • From OE ricedom: power, rule, dominion: Ðín rícedóm ofer ús ríxie ... usually translated as: 'thy kingdom come' (word for word: Thy rikedom over us govern ...)

    (O. Sax. ríki-dóm power : O. Frs. ríke-dóm : O. H. Ger. ríhhi-tuom imperium; divitiae : Icel. rík-dómr power; wealth.)

    April 6, 2012

  • vath - danger
    1909, John Barbour, The Bruce, Volume 1, edition digitized, Adam and Charlie Black, published 2020, page 124:

    With few menyhe mycht soyn thame scath, / And yhet eschape withouten vath.

    March 29, 2012

  • @ bilby ... No from Middle English ingang, from Old English ingang.

    February 14, 2012


  • From German meaning "purity law" (Reinheit=purity, Gebot=law, order (see gebod)) ... normally associated with brewing beer.

    Pronounced like /rine-HITE-ge-bote/ or with diacritics: /rīn-HĪT-ge-bōt/

    February 7, 2012


  • Old English and Dutch: order, command, mandate
    Pronounced with a long ō ... /ge-BODE/.

    February 7, 2012

  • Unlike many words in Uncleftish Beholding (cleverly done), the word rike IS a standing English word and not made up.

    For al þis rike A ded knyght wald I noght strike. — Seven Sages, a1425
    The bishop (Tunstal) of Durham was deprived of his bishop-rike. —Literary Remains of King Edward the Sixth, 1857

    January 27, 2012

  • From the OED:
    dwaal |dwɑːl|
    noun S. African
    a dreamy, dazed, or absent-minded state: You're in a real dwaal !

    January 26, 2012

  • From Middle English bergh, berg, from Old English berg, beorg (“mountain, hill”).

    January 22, 2012

  • samod - I. adv. simultaneously, at the same time, together; entirely; also, as well, too.
    II. prep. together with, at (of time) compare to Ger. sammt.

    January 5, 2012

  • nutte, n — use, usefulness; nought to nuttes, of no use, useless.

    c1275 Layamon's Brut: A he seide þat Bruttes neoren noht to nuttes, ah he seide þat þe Peohtes weoren gode cnihtes.

    December 27, 2011

  • "I will to the West, and gemote alle mie knyghtes" — Thomas Chatterton, "The Rowley Poems", 1778

    December 21, 2011

  • Old plural form of bote, bot.

    December 19, 2011

  • From the OED: A fine to be paid as compensation to a close kinsman of the victim of a killing.

    Other forms: magbote, maegbote

    see also manbot

    December 19, 2011

  • From OE sædraca
    *sea-dragon

    December 17, 2011

  • I think this is an eggcorn of kith and kin. Albeit, an old one. The word kith more generally refers to friends and acquaintances while kin refers to family ... thus kith and kin means "friends and family".

    The word kine is an archaic plural of cow. So kith and kine would mean "friends and cows".

    Kin and Kine would make more sense than kith and kine. Other than a play on words in a book about cows, I haven't found "kith and kine" used.

    In ME English we find such spelling variations: Oþer whyle þou muste be fals a-monge kythe & kynne. ... and here kynne = kin.

    So I think this is nothing more than eggcorn.

    December 17, 2011

  • OE - warrior, hero

    Descendant
    freke

    December 11, 2011

  • Go not forthe as a dombe freke. — Book of Courtesy, 1475

    From ME freke, from OE freca.
    plural - frekes or freken

    1. A brave man, a warrior, a man-at-arms
    * Þen found he no frekes to fraist on his strenght. — Destruction of Troy, 1540
    * There was never a freke one foot would flee, but still in stour did stand,” — Henry Morley, A Bundle of Ballads, 1891

    2. A man, a human being, a person
    *þes fifti, alle ferliche freken. — St. Katherine of Alexandria, 1225
    *Go not forthe as a dombe freke. — Book of Courtesy, 1475

    3. A creature such as a giant, demon, angel
    *Bringing my love, for Time’s a freke of jealous strain; — Richard F. Burton, The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night, 1885

    December 11, 2011

  • Middle English
    1. To send or bring speedily; to hasten; to launch, to hurl a weapon; to proceed
    He lette þider fusen al þat he hafde ihalden, þat corn of þissen londe. — Layamon's Brut, 1275

    2. To put to flight; pursue, to banish, to rush or charge at
    Oþer þu heom fusen, oþer þu heom feolle. — Layamon's Brut, 1275

    3. To urge on or exhort

    Related to fus.

    December 11, 2011

  • fus (foos) - striving forward, eager for, ready for, inclined to, willing, prompt
    expectant, brave, noble: ready to depart, dying. >>> ME fous >>> fouse

    Same root:

    fûse = fûslîce
    fûslêoþ n.- death-song, dirge.
    fûslic - ready to start: excellent.
    fûslîce adv - readily, gladly.
    fûsnes f. - quickness

    December 10, 2011

  • fela - I. sbn. and adj. - many, much II. adv. very much, many. .. (fele; Ger. viel)

    December 9, 2011

  • adv. even, exactly, quite, already, just as, at first, further, previously; from OE forþum, forþan, forþon.

    December 7, 2011

  • Also spelled fela (OE fela) ...
    As a noun/pronoun = many, majority
    As an adj =many, much, various comparativ ... feler (more), felest (most)
    As an adv = very, greatly

    The felest = the majority

    December 7, 2011

  • I have no people living ; none, Thank God ! will mourn me there,
    Dreaming in misery of one Whose clouded eyes upstare
    --Collected poems of Alexander G. Steven

    December 4, 2011

  • urgrund: basis; primary principle, cause or factor.

    Other words with ur- urtext, ursprache

    December 4, 2011

  • counterstroke, counterblow, riposte


    Byspel: Patton's gainclapp against the Germans at the Battle of the Bulge crushed their offensive.

    December 2, 2011

  • swink + ful
    (a) Full of toil, toilsome; laborious, arduous; of pain: toilsome, distressing, full of travail
    (b) hard-working, diligent
    (c) as noun: those who toil or labor.

    December 1, 2011

  • huru, umbe are two more good ones

    December 1, 2011

  • whilwende (adj.) Also (early) whilende; from OE hwilwende, hwilende (transitory, temporary)
    *transitory, temporary

    November 30, 2011

  • beshone - beautified, lighted, enlightened, brightened, well lit

    November 30, 2011

  • From ME kire (also cyre, cure), from Old English cyre (choice, free will).
    *choice, preference
    *chosen, the elite
    *custom; customary
    *free will
    *decision, selection
    Bigamie is unkinde ðing, On engleis tale, twie-wifing; for ai was rigt and ***kire*** bi-forn, On man, on wif, til he was boren. — "Genesis and Exodus"

    Japanese:
    kire (hiragana きれ)
    切れ: sharpness; cloth; slice

    November 30, 2011

  • Benote gainsay? Eath!

    Luke 21:15 KJV
    For I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which all your adversaries shall not be able to gainsay nor resist .

    Other gain- words:
    gainclap (also gainclapp) - counterstroke, counterblow, riposte
    gaincope - head off, cut off
    gainstand - to stand against
    gainstrive - to strive against

    November 30, 2011

  • counterstroke, counterblow, riposte

    Patton's gainclap against the Germans at the Battle of the Bulge crushed their offensive.

    November 30, 2011

  • "The Weekly Standard" moved the writ to: here

    http://www.weeklystandard.com/Content/Public/Articles/000/000/015/094mwbwu.asp

    November 28, 2011

  • delve, dalf, dolven

    November 28, 2011

  • Inwit, a term for conscience, suggests the inner senses and interior sensibility, which accords nicely with the current state of the senses under the regime of electric technologies. — Marshall McLuhan, The Agenbite of Outwit, 1998

    November 28, 2011

  • Also means "buried".

    November 28, 2011

  • It argues that a rhetorical approach maintains space for agency on the behalf of employees (through the *witcraft* of argument) ... — Gillian Symon, Developing the Political Perspective on Technological Change Through Rhetorical Analysis, Management Communication Quarterly, Vol. 22, No. 1., 2008

    November 27, 2011

  • Of persons: perfidious, traitorous, false, deceitful;
    of behavior: treacherous.

    November 25, 2011

  • (a) To know or realize (sth.), be aware of; realize
    (b) to recognize (sb.); beknown: known, acquainted.

    November 25, 2011

  • I think it has been besteaded by frack/frak ... What the frack? What a frack up! LOL

    November 23, 2011

  • From Middle English lude (“noise, clamor, sound”), from Old English hlȳd (“noise, sound, tumult, disturbance, dissension”), from Proto-Germanic *hlūdijō (“sound”), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlewe- (“to hear”).

    Cognate with Scots lood, luid (“sound, noise, tone, voice”), Dutch geluid (“sound”), German Laut (“sound”), Swedish ljud (“sound”), Icelandic hljóð (“sound”).

    lude (n), (plural luden)
    *** Sound, noise, clamor
    - Þa hunten wenden æfter mid muchelen heora *lude*. — Layamon's Brut
    - Þa *luden* heo iherden of þan Rom-leoden. — Layamon's Brut

    November 22, 2011

  • verb from OE to cover, hem in, surround: overload, oppress ... root is teld (tent)

    other verbs with teld as the root: upteld, unteld.

    November 22, 2011

  • And seldseen costly stones of so great price — Marlowe, The Jew of Malta

    ... and awakening, saw a serpent like a dragon, a seldseen sight, — The Arabian Nights

    November 22, 2011

  • Noun
    ġewiss n
    *certainty, surety, that which is certain

    Adjective
    *certain, sure
    *trustworthy, reliable; knowing, aware
    Usage notes
    When used adverbally with mid, (i.e. mid ġewisse), the word means "especially", or "certainly"

    Also gewis

    November 22, 2011

  • Also gewiss
    Noun
    ġewis n
    *certainty, surety, that which is certain
    Adjective
    *certain, sure
    *trustworthy, reliable; knowing, aware
    Usage notes
    When used adverbally with mid, (i.e. mid ġewisse), the word means "especially", or "certainly"

    November 22, 2011

  • From Middle English foresetten, from Old English foresettan (“to place before, shut in, propose, prefer, precede”), equivalent to fore- +‎ set.
    Verb
    foreset (present participle foresetting, simple past and past participle foreset)
    *To set before or in front of ... thus to propose, suggest
    *To ordain; assign; allot in advance.
    Derived Terms: foresetting
    Noun
    foreset (plural foresets)
    *That which is set ahead or before; proposal, suggestion.
    *(geology) The deposition of sediment by the turbidity currents above the reservoir water level.
    Derived Terms: (geology) foreset bed
    Adjective
    foreset (comparative more foreset, superlative most foreset)
    Set in fore or front part; placed ahead.

    November 21, 2011

  • foredraft (plural foredrafts)
    ***Land leading from a dwelling to a road or field.
    Farm containing messuage, barns, stable, buildings, gardens, foldyard and rickyard (1.1.39), the lane or Foredraft … — Shropshire Archives, 1835
    He returned at last, and pointing to a tree that stood over on the far side of the foredraft which led up to the farm,… — A Modern Antaeus, 1901
    We would have scurried across the farmyard, scattering the flustered fowl as we went, then down the foredraft to wait by the gate… — Richard P. Mayer, The Young Gongoozler, 2010
    ***A current of air that flows forward
    If the connections to the two plenums are air-tite, then there will be a back draft in one stream and a foredraft … — HVAC-Talk, 2006
    Not phased by trucks or light winds. You drift into their foredraft and then back out of their backdraft as one solid unit … — TundraTalk, Towing Report, 2007
    The freight, after passing through Brick Station, would switch onto a trunk line and skirt the yards on its way north to Chicago. He listened intently, and picked up the foredraft of its cattle cars. — C.K. Robin, Judas Goat: A Fable
    ***(nautical) The draft at the fore perpendicular. Also "fore draft".
    ... wherein said foredraft part includes at least a moorage hull part, — Floating offshore structure : U.S. Patent Number 4,519,728, 1985
    ***proposal

    November 20, 2011

  • @sionnach ... I think you meant "was likened" or maybe you mean "is likened"? I've never heard a hot water bottle called a bedoven but if it burst then you might be bedoven in hot water!

    The comparison was doven to bedoven. Bedoven is the past participle of the archaic bedive.

    November 18, 2011

  • From Middle English snape (“to nip, injure, afflict; cold, nipping; to rebuke, revile, criticize”), also snaipen, from Old Norse snepya (“to outrage, dishonor, disgrace”)

    Verb - snape (simple past and past participle snaped)

    1. (Shipbuilding) To bevel the end of a timber to fit against an inclined surface.
    2. to nip, injure, afflict
    Þe snawe snitered ful snart, þat snayped þe wylde. — Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
    3. to be hard upon, rebuke, snub, criticize
    Vte of desert þar he was in, He com to snaip þe king sinn. — Cursor Mundi

    November 17, 2011

  • Also to-fall ... at to-fall of the day — A. E. Houseman, More Poems, XLIV

    November 17, 2011

  • Behight v. t. (past behight; past part. behight, behoten)

    November 14, 2011

  • Sun-glade or sun glint - Both of these terms refer to a type of bright reflection of the sun from the surface of a water body. This may be observed from an aircraft flying over a large lake, or even in visible weather satellite imagery. In fact sun glint seen in visible satellite imagery often appears as a large bright region over the tropical ocean areas. Small brighter spots of sun glint over otherwise dark ocean surfaces indicate relatively calm seas (glassy and smooth) with very light surface winds.

    November 14, 2011

  • Sun-glade or sun glint - Both of these terms refer to a type of bright reflection of the sun from the surface of a water body. This may be observed from an aircraft flying over a large lake, or even in visible weather satellite imagery. In fact sun glint seen in visible satellite imagery often appears as a large bright region over the tropical ocean areas. Small brighter spots of sun glint over otherwise dark ocean surfaces indicate relatively calm seas (glassy and smooth) with very light surface winds.

    November 14, 2011

  • from ME glāde (n) ... also glode, glede; from OE *gæld, *gæld bright place (see glæd adj.)

    (a) a gleam of light (moonglade) ... thus:
    (b) A bright space, an open space (everglade); also, an open or cleared space in a forest;
    (c) a bright patch of sky; the bright space between clouds
    (d) a bright surface of snow/ice ... a glade of ice
    (e) an open space in the ice on a river or lake

    November 14, 2011

  • froward - (of a person) difficult to deal with; contrary.

    frowardly - adverb,
    frowardness - noun

    November 14, 2011

  • rike - (ME rike, OE ríce, ) - (a) Sovereignty, dominion, authority; fongen (taken) to ~, to ascend the throne, take up royal power; (b) the territory over which authority extends, a kingdom, an earldom, a diocese, district, city, etc.

    riken - to reign, to rule

    OE ríce I. strong, powerful, great, mighty, of high rank, 
    II. n. rule, reign, power, might, authority, empire, 
    fón tó ríce to ascend the throne: kingdom, nation, diocese, reign (period of time). Se sunu feng to þam rice (The son ascended the throne.)
    rícedom n. kingly rule
    ríceter, rícetere n. force, might, power, rule, dominion, glory, greatness; ambition; tyranny, oppression, violence.
    ríclic sumptuous, adv. -líce (like) powerfully; sumptuously, (rikely)
    rícsere m. ruler (riker)
    rícsian to bear rule, reign, govern, tyrannize, dominate, prevail. (to rike)
    rícsiend m. ruler
rícsung f. domination

    November 6, 2011

  • zwinger - a fortress protecting a city . Origin of ZWINGER. G, fr. MHG twinger

    November 6, 2011

  • Past participle of benim ... benim, benom, benomen

    November 5, 2011

  • benim, benom, benomen ... or benim, benam, benumen (from benumen we have benumb)

    He þrowede for us and binom ure sunnan.
    (He suffered for us and benom our sins.) - ''Homilies in Lambeth''

    Ich wene, er we hom come, Clarel ous worþ bynome.
    (I ween, before we came home, Clarel benome us of our worth.) - ''Otuel''

    That hadde his breth almost bynomen.
    (That had his breath almost benomen.) - ''Romance of the Rose''

    A man that is benomyn on his legges or on his arms or in any oþer place of hyme.
    (A man that is benomen on his legs or on his arms or in other place of him.) - ''Medical Recipes''

    1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book XVI:
    there he founde a chayre sette, on the lyffte syde which was a worme-etyn and fyeble tre besyde hit, and on the ryght honde were two floures lyke a lylye: and that one wolde a benomme the tothir hir whyghtnes.

    November 4, 2011

  • From ME dighten, from OE dryhten (i) m. ruler, king, lord, prince; the Lord, God, Christ, 'drightin'

    November 3, 2011

  • Past participle of dive ... dive, dove, doven. Liken to bedoven.

    November 3, 2011

  • From Old Norse ǣtla (to think, mean, suppose, intend, purpose) and from Old English eahtan (pursue, estimate, appreciate) and eahtian (æ, e) (to estimate, esteem, consult about, consider, deliberate: watch over, speak of with praise). Ger. achten

    eahtung f. estimation, valuation, deliberation, counsel.

    November 3, 2011

  • It was latch, laught, laught ... and catch was catch, catched, catched ...

    November 2, 2011

  • From Afrikaans, literally ‘show off’, from Dutch pronken ‘to strut.’

    Thus pronk-bedden are show beds.

    November 2, 2011

  • thereanent - Concerning that; regarding or respecting that matter.

    November 2, 2011

  • eftsoons ... forefast (prefix) eft + soon + s.

    eft- = re-, again, after

    November 2, 2011

  • In ME it was wlātsom.

    October 30, 2011

  • (a) Hunt. To search for the spoor, explore; -- used of either the hunter or the hound; ~ abouten, of the hunter: cast about, explore; of the hound: sniff around;
    (b) to search (a place) thoroughly; also, hunt. seek (the quarry);
    (c) to surround (sb., sth., a place), encircle, beset; of a bird: circle around (an area);
    (d) to bind (sth.) with cords, tie up;
    (e) to cover (sb.) with a shadow, shade; -- used fig.

    October 29, 2011

  • skift - (a) A share, portion; lot, fate; (b) an effort, attempt, a try

    skift (v) - (a) To divide or share out something; distribute, divide up; also, be divided; ~ in sonder, disperse (a group of people), scatter; ~ me even, give me my fair share; even skifted, evenly matched in number, in equal strength; (b) to arrange, ordain; arrange, ordain, cause to occur; also, rule (a country), manage (a horse); also, protect (sb.), save; be skifted of, evade, be rid of.

    From OE sciftan.

    October 29, 2011

  • Smiker - beautiful, from ME smiker, beautiful; from OE smicer/smicor - beauteous, elegant, fair, tasteful.

    More/Most smiker ...

    October 29, 2011

  • Widderwin - opponent, adversary ... also spelled widerwin or witherwin from OE and ME witherwin.

    October 27, 2011

  • noysom = annoysome,
    (a) Troublesome, difficult; disturbing;
    (b) harmful, injurious;
    (c) grievous;
    (d) troubled, sad;
    (e) irritable or irritating.

    October 22, 2011

  • Also spelled threpe.
    As a noun:
    (a) Contention, strife; battle; also, a battle, contest;
    without ~, without argument; without opposition;
    (b) insistence, importunity;

    October 21, 2011

  • 1. Madness; also, an overmastering emotion, specif. rage or fury; for (pure) ~.
    2. In misc. adv. phrases with for prep.: for ~:
    (a) in a panic, frantically;
    (b) ferociously, fiercely;
    (c) intensely, furiously, like mad.

    October 20, 2011

  • 1. (a) Bold, daring, courageous; valiant, doughty, noble (knight, king); (b) audacious, forward; impudent, wicked.
    2. Strong, sturdy, powerful; massive (hills); precious (jewel); great, boisterous (commotion); great (miracle).
    3. (a) Fierce, dreadful, cruel; dreaded, painful; (b) wicked, sinful.
    4.Difficult; hard (to do).

    October 20, 2011

  • lendes and lenden are plurals of lende.

    Before it was "gird your loins" it was "gird the lendes"!

    Byspels: Tak we þe armor of God..gird þe lendis in trowþ.

    October 19, 2011

  • lendes and lenden are plurals of lende.

    Before it was "gird your loins" it was "gird the lendes"!

    Byspels: Tak we þe armor of God..gird þe lendis in trowþ.

    October 19, 2011

  • Before it was "gird your loins" it was "gird thee lendes"!

    Byspels: Tak we þe armor of God..gird þe lendis in trowþ.

    October 19, 2011

  • Before it was "gird your loins" it was "gird thee lendes"!

    Byspels: Tak we þe armor of God..gird þe lendis in trowþ.

    October 19, 2011

  • girden (up) lendes - to wrap (one's, someone's) loins; cover (one's) nakedness; fig. gird (one's) loins, prepare, get ready.

    lend or lende in the singular; lendes or lenden in plural.

    October 19, 2011

  • alt singular is lend

    Could be lend, lende in singular lendes, lenden in plural.

    October 19, 2011

  • girden (up) lendes - to wrap (one's, someone's) loins; cover (one's) nakedness; fig. gird (one's) loins, prepare, get ready.

    Alt plural is lenden.

    October 19, 2011

  • Alternate plural for lendes (loins).

    October 19, 2011

  • girden (up) lendes - to wrap (one's, someone's) loins; cover (one's) nakedness; fig. gird (one's) loins, prepare, get ready.

    October 19, 2011

  • From Middle English: girden (up) lendes - to wrap (one's, someone's) loins; cover (one's) nakedness; fig. gird (one's) loins, prepare, get ready.

    lendes = loins

    October 19, 2011

  • aby or abey - past: abought, past part.: abought

    3rd person sing.: abys/abeys

    abying/abeying

    October 19, 2011

  • hux - from ME ... An insulting or derisive remark, a jeer; mockery.

    October 18, 2011

  • besmith - from OE besmiþian, to work (in metal), forge, surround with forged work.

    October 18, 2011

  • hosp - OE ... reproach, insult, contumely, blasphemy

    October 18, 2011

  • hospword - hosp + word; abusive language, contemptuous expression, pejorative

    hosp - OE, reproach, insult, contumely, blasphemy

    October 18, 2011

  • frakel (noun and adjective) - Vile, foul, wretched, worthless; this frakel world.
    fraced (adj) - Evil, wicked.

    October 18, 2011

  • hospul - contemptible; from OE hospul based on hosp.

    October 17, 2011

  • bedoven - drenched, drowned; from the past particle of archaic bedive (immerse, submerge, drown)

    October 16, 2011

  • awrite- from ME awritan from OE āwrītan meaning to write, write down, describe, compose;
    mark, inscribe, draw, carve, copy. 'awrite'

    October 16, 2011

  • bewrite- to write about, describe, copy, write to

    October 16, 2011

  • Bewry - to cover, clothe, conceal, hide, cover up, cover over, protect.

    October 15, 2011

  • From OE benemnan - to name: stipulate, settle, declare, asseverate

    October 13, 2011

  • Variant of scop - poet

    October 12, 2011

  • hof n. - enclosure, court, dwelling, building, house, hall: temple, sanctuary.

    October 11, 2011

  • I think I like this spelling better than queme ... no qualms about how to say queem!

    October 10, 2011

  • Also spelled as queem.

    October 10, 2011

  • In OE there was no 'v' ... here, the f=v.
    bedofen - drowned ; pp. of bedúfan. (bedoven, pp of beduvan)
    dúfan - past: ðú dufe, pl. dufon; pp. dofen To DIVE, sink

    dove is just a mutation of the ú in the 2nd person (ðu duve); doven straight from dofen.

    In ME we have bedoven for "drenched" or "drowned":
    Alle hir body..semyd be dowen in blood (here w=v)- Life of Saint Christina Mirabilis of Saint Trudons St.Christina Mirab. (All her body seemed bedoven in blood.)

    October 6, 2011

  • Variant of lof; see lof n. praise, glory, repute / song of praise, hymn.
    II. (in poems, skalds, skops) n. protection, help.

    Variant of love; (f = v).

    October 3, 2011

  • Also lofe; in both lof and lofe pronounce the 'o' long as in lofe.

    October 3, 2011

  • lof n. praise, glory, repute / song of praise, hymn.
    II. (in poems, skalds, skops) n. protection, help.

    October 3, 2011

  • It can be used alone ... umbe ... or as a prefix ... um ... umwelt (environment), umbeset (surround), umbecast (cast around), umthink (bethink, meditate, consider), umbethink (consider), umgang (circuit)

    September 27, 2011

  • Busk >>> from O.N. buask "to make oneself ready"

    September 17, 2011

  • Thene the emperour was egree, and enkerly fraynes. The answere of Arthure. - Morte Arthure

    September 17, 2011

  • The knygt in the enker gren. - Sir Gawayne and the Green Knight

    September 17, 2011

  • Often brooked as a forefast:

    eardbegenga m. inhabitant
    eardbegengnes f. habitation
    eardfæst settled, abiding
    eardgeard ¶ m. place of habitation, world. (Midgard)
    eardgyfu ¶ f. gift from one's native place. (erdgift)
    eardiend m. dweller
    eardiendlic habitable
    eardstapa m. wanderer (erdstapa - erd+stapa grasshopper)
    eardstede m. habitation (erdsted - erd+sted place)
    ±eardung f. dwelling-abode, tabernacle.
    eardungburg f. city of habitation.
    eardunghûs n. tabernacle, habitation. (erdhouse)
    eardungstôw f. habitation, dwelling-place, tabernacle, CP.
    eardweall m. land-rampart, bulwark (earthwall)
    eardwîc ¶ n. dwelling.
    eardwrecca m. exile
    eardwunung f. dwelling in one's own country

    September 16, 2011

  • From OE eard “native place, country, region, dwelling-place, estate, cultivated ground, earth, land”

    September 15, 2011

  • Etymology - OE upspring - origin, birth, rising up

    September 15, 2011

  • To entice
    And thus the young soldier is to be train’d on to the warfare of life; ... that more things be not represented as dangerous than really are so; and then, that whatever you observe him to be more frighted at than he should, you be sure to tole him on to by insensible degrees ... - "Some Thoughts Concerning Education"

    To lure
    It is often necessary to tole a big stag, to induce him to leave the hind ...

    September 14, 2011

  • It means environment.

    September 12, 2011

  • Don't forget the comparatives: eather, eathest.

    September 12, 2011

  • In OE, it was also a noun meaning an easy to do.
    Also can be used as a forefast (prefix) (hyphen not needed):
    eath-seen ... easily seen, clear, plain, clearly
    eath-fare ... easy to travel over
    eath-find ... easy to find, easy to be found
    eath-get ... easy to get, easily gotten
    eath-win ... easy to win, easily won, easily obtained
    ... And many more!

    September 12, 2011

  • OE tungol nm., nap. tunglu, tungol and (late) tunglan luminary, star, planet,
    constellation

    September 10, 2011

  • Starcraft is also Anglish for astronomy.

    September 10, 2011

  • This is UK slang ... per other info most likely London slang.

    The root of the word means horse: O.E. hengest "horse, stallion, gelding," from P.Gmc. **hangistas (cf. O.Fris. hengst, Du. hengest, Ger. Hengst "stallion"). Related to henchman (“high-ranking servant”).

    September 10, 2011

  • This is UK slang ... per other info most likely London slang.

    The root of the word means horse: O.E. hengest "horse, stallion, gelding," from P.Gmc. **hangistas (cf. O.Fris. hengst, Du. hengest, Ger. Hengst "stallion"). Related to henchman (“high-ranking servant”).

    September 10, 2011

  • OE - gâl I. n. lust, luxury, wantonness, folly, levity. II. adj. gay, light, wanton, Bo, BH: proud, wicked. 'gole'

    This is a cognate with German "geil" as shown in ME:

    Gal, adj. lascivious, S; gole, pl., MD.—AS. gál; cp. OHG. geil

    September 8, 2011

  • Zia - fear, a Gadite (1 Chr. 5:13).
    Source: Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary

    September 8, 2011

  • Sounds like reekel. Shares the same root as reek.
    from OE recels
    (a) Incense, frankincense; ~ fat OE recels-fæt, a vessel for incense; a censer, thurible;
    (b) the smoke or aroma of incense; ~ smoke;
    (c) med. frankincense used in ointments, etc.; bastard ~, an inferior grade of incense; flour (poudre) of ~, ~ dust; fresh ~, whit ~, a superior grade of incense.

    September 6, 2011

  • Should be rekels, said like reekel. Shares the same root as reek.
    from OE recels
    (a) Incense, frankincense; ~ fat OE recels-fæt, a vessel for incense; a censer, thurible;
    (b) the smoke or aroma of incense; ~ smoke;
    (c) med. frankincense used in ointments, etc.; bastard ~, an inferior grade of incense; flour (poudre) of ~, ~ dust; fresh ~, whit ~, a superior grade of incense.

    September 6, 2011

  • Hador - bright, clear: the clear, serene sky

    September 1, 2011

  • snotor, snoter, snottor, snotter, snottra adj. - clever, wise, intelligent, prudent, discerning, sagacious

    September 1, 2011

  • theow is from þeow, ðeow - serf, servant, slave
    thew comes from þeaw, ðeaw - usage, custom, habit, conduct, disposition

    August 30, 2011

  • word, message, loudly-spoken message, loud talk, noise, din, chatter, merrymaking

    from Icel. glam, a tinkling sound, noise

    * 1888, A. L. Mayhew and Walter W. Skeat, "A Concise Dictionary of Middle English From A.D. 1150 To 1580", glam

    God's glam to him ... "Purity" by Gawain

    The glam from the machinery was so loud, that we had to shout to be heard.

    August 30, 2011

  • OE - infaru - invasion, incursion, inroad, march into a country

    August 29, 2011

  • From OE ælfscíene - bright as an elf or fairy, beautiful like an elf or nymph, of elfin beauty, radiant

    August 29, 2011

  • æ = a in hat
    g = y

    August 29, 2011

  • In Old and Middle English, fair = beautiful.

    Mirror, Mirror, on the wall
    Who is the fairest of them all? >>> Who is the most beautiful of them all.


    There's no 'i' ... This is a misspelling. ME is feier

    fæger ( ̄æ) I. fair, lovely, beautiful
    fæger- = fægr-
    fægerlice splendidly
    fægernes f. fairness, beauty
    fægerwyrde smooth-speaking
    fægre ( ̄æ) fairly, elegantly, beautifully
    fægrian to become beautiful: adorn, decorate.

    August 29, 2011

  • There's no 'i' ... This is a misspelling. ME is feier

    fæger ( ̄æ) I. fair, lovely, beautiful
    fæger- = fægr-
    fægerlice splendidly
    fægernes f. fairness, beauty
    fægerwyrde smooth-speaking
    fægre ( ̄æ) fairly, elegantly, beautifully
    fægrian to become beautiful: adorn, decorate.

    August 29, 2011

  • Wordstock - a stock of words, vocabulary, lexis, terminology

    A kenning of word+stock. A stock or store of words.

    August 24, 2011

  • OE - huru, adverb: at least, at all events, at any rate, in any case, however, even, yet, only, indeed, certainly, especially

    It is good for all wounds, huru for deep wounds.
    ... huru not to a heathen nation ... or nay huru
    their humility could not avail aught, and huru not their pride

    August 23, 2011

  • Anglish - The melding of Anglo and English. The brook of words mostly with Anglo-Saxon, Scandinavian, or Germanic roots (Danish, Dutch, Frankish, Frisian, German, Icelandic, Norwegian, Swedish) while huru (OE -huru: especially) keeping away from un-Germanic French words and Latinates brought into the tongue after the year 1066.

    New kennings may be made or Anglo-Saxon/Old English words that were put aside for Latinates may be brought back.

    Writers differ on whether to brook words with Greek roots and words struck by eard-English speakers (OE-eard: native) with un-Germanic roots.

    August 23, 2011

  • Not hard to put it right for Anderson's oversights.

    ordinary - everyday ... The least uncleft is that of EVERYDAY
    waterstuff.

    around - ringing ... prefix um (OE ym(b)) ...
    There is a heavy kernel with a forward bernstonish lading, and RINGING it one or more light motes with backward ladings.

    Early worldken folk thought bernstonebits UMswing/RINGS/LOOPS/ the kernel like the earth RINGS/LOOPS the sun

    roundaround board (orbit) - ring/loop/wheel path (OE hweollast)/whirlt (OE hwyrlt)
    This is readily seen when all are set forth in what is called the roundaround board of the firststuffs.

    August 23, 2011

  • n. A mote, an atom :-- Mot attomos, Wrt. Voc. i. 284, 37: ii. 8, 10. Mote atomo, 9, 62. Tó hwí gesihst ðú ðæt mot (festucam) on ðínes bróðor égan, Mt. Kmbl. 7, 3, 5. Ðú gesáwe gehwǽde mot on ðínes bróðor eáge, R. Ben. 12, 3. Ðæt lytle mot ... ðone mot, Lk. Skt. Lind. 6, 41, 42.
    Bosworth, J. (2010, March 21). An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online (T. N. Toller & Others, Eds.). Mot. Retrieved August 22, 2011, from http://bosworth.ff.cuni.cz/023189

    There is, AFAIK, no attested link between mot and mótan. Don't look at likeness and go from that.

    August 22, 2011

  • frosent - apostle; John Cheke's Book of Matthew

    August 22, 2011