Comments by GHibbs

  • The word prognoses is also the third person singular and present indicative of prognose from which you obtain a prognosis. The equivalent from prognosticate would be prognosticates that sounds very clumsy.

    March 24, 2014

  • The word prognosing is the present participle of prognose from which you obtain a prognosis. The equivalent from prognosticate would be prognosticating that sounds very clumsy.

    March 24, 2014

  • The word prognosed is the past and past participle of prognose from which you obtain a prognosis. The equivalent from prognosticate would be prognosticated that sounds very clumsy.

    March 24, 2014

  • There were no frosts this year, where I live. Normally there are many nights and some days when there are frosts. The word frosts is the plural of the noun (a) frost.

    March 18, 2014

  • Foxes and badgers live in earths. The earths of the electrical equipment in homes are sometimes removed during home improvements. Earths are the plural of the noun earth.

    March 17, 2014

  • The word impunes is the third person singular or present indicative of the verb impune, 'to attribute the blame to ...'. The English examples agree with this meaning.

    February 26, 2014

  • The word impuned is the past or past participle of the verb impune, 'to attribute the blame to ...'. The examples agree with this meaning.

    February 26, 2014

  • In my experience, in British English usage, the word impune is a verb that means 'to attribute the blame to ...'. I do not remember ever hearing the adjectival use here that has almost the opposite meaning.  The examples above, as of 26/2/14 agree with that.

    February 26, 2014

  • The word impuning is the present participle of the verb impune, 'to attribute the blame to ...'. The examples agree with this meaning.

    February 26, 2014

  • I would expect to describe the hair or tail of a hog as a hog's hair or tail.

    February 1, 2014

  • A sow's is the possessive of the noun sow, female pig. There is a regional variant of the idiom 'He made a dog's ear of it', that substitutes sow for dog. He made a sow's ear of it.'

    February 1, 2014

  • The word set is also the past and presumably also the past participle of the verb set. So the word upset is also the past and presumably also the past participle of the verb upset.

    December 14, 2013

  • The word set is also the past and presumably also the past participle of the verb set.

    December 14, 2013

  • It appears that with this irregular verb rendezvous also functions as the third person singular and present indicative.

    December 10, 2013

  • A fly-weight is also a flyweight, a category in boxing.

    September 14, 2013

  • larks'>skylarks">larks is also the plural of the noun lark, a bird.  They are also skylark skylarks.

    September 11, 2013

  • Of a blood cell that has changed from being round to the shape of a sickle. In sickle-cell disease red cells become sickled.

    August 10, 2013

  • 1. try-ons may be attempts to gain approval for activities that may usually be forbidden. A teenager is likely to have a try-on or two with his or her parents.
    2. They might want to try the fit of several garments and have a try-on or many try-ons.

    August 5, 2013

  • A try-on may be an attempt to gain approval for something by doing something that may usually be forbidden. A teenager is likely to have try-ons with his or her parents. That was a clever try-on but it did not work!

    August 5, 2013

  • trueseed's comment below (3/2/08) is just fine. I learned that round "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" and many other rounds at school and since.

    This definition is now included in the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition, above: "Music A composition for two or more voices in which each voice enters at a different time with the same melody."

    July 17, 2013

  • 'To come round' is to recover consciousness.
    'To bring round' is to attempt to cause a person to return to consciousness. An anesthetist/anesthesiologist/anaesthetist might do that.
    'round' does not seem to appear in the entry as of 17/7/13.

    July 17, 2013

  • A butty is also a narrow boat with no engine. They may attach several butties behind a working narrow boat. They used them in the UK, for carrying such things as coal, stones, newsprint (paper for the newspaper industry).

    January 3, 2013

  • 'Discipling' is the present participle of the verb disciple.

    November 6, 2012

  • 'Discipled' is the past participle of the verb disciple.

    November 6, 2012

  • 'Disciples' is also part of the verb disciple.

    November 6, 2012

  • A curtaining is a cloth (fabric, material) from which to make curtains. 'Curtainings' is the plural of that noun.

    November 2, 2012

  • Conveyanced is the past participle of the verb 'to conveyance'. The lawyer conveyanced my house.

    October 31, 2012

  • A cashback is now usually used as a marketing device, as the comments show. Earlier, at least in the UK and before cash machines worked well, supermarkets promoted it to allow customers to take cash from their own bank account when they paid using a debit card. The customer might then spend that cash in the store. Also, at that time a customer might need come to the store and buy goods mainly to obtain the cash.

    July 1, 2012

  • As in the examples, cashbacks is the plural of the noun cashback that has become a common procedure for marketing.

    July 1, 2012

  • The word sunblinds is plural of the noun sunblind, as in the examples.

    June 26, 2012

  • staffing is also the present participle of the verb to staff.

    June 24, 2012

  • spreads is also a transitive and intransitive inflection of the verb to spread, as in the examples on this page.

    June 24, 2012

  • The verb to splinter has the inflection splinters. 'He' or 'she' splinters something, so is transitive, but 'it' splinters itself or something else, so may be intransitive or transitive.

    The examples are nearly all of the plural of the noun, but the examples of the verb include one of a company that splinters.

    June 24, 2012

  • Also part of the verb slide.

    June 23, 2012

  • slaves is also part of the verb slave, that is often used in the form slave away, slaves away.

    June 23, 2012

  • sizes is also part of the verbs size. To size means see what the size is, or to apply the substance size to ...

    June 23, 2012

  • This is the plural of the noun potmark. There may be potmarks on buildings after small arms fire.
    There were pockmarks on the skin of people who survived smallpox.

    The word potmarks is also third person singular of the verb potmark. This would refer to the process of potmarking which could be by shooting at a wall and leaving dents.

    June 22, 2012

  • There is a noun and a verb potmark which might refer to the results of shooting at a wall, taking potshots with small arms.

    The present participle potmarking is more frequently used than the other inflections, and there are many examples in that entry.

    The other inflections are potmarks, potmarked.

    The parallel noun and verb pockmark refers to the pocks of smallpox. The noun and verb pockmark and is also used for pits in metal and other substances that remind of a pock.

    June 22, 2012

  • Although, from the examples, mainly used as a noun, the word 'seeds' is also part of the verb 'to seed'. 'A farmer seeds his fields with good seed'.

    June 21, 2012

  • As in some of the examples, 'scrutinies' is the plural of the noun 'scrutiny'. In the UK, in local government there are 'scrutiny committees' who task is to conduct 'scrutinies'.

    Those committees work by scrutinising policies and how they are working, or should work, in a similar way to 'select committees' in UK Central Government.

    A local authority scrutiny committee can require witnesses who are public servants to attend and give evidence.

    June 20, 2012

  • The noun 'savouries' is the plural of the noun 'savoury' which is the preferred version in the UK of 'savory, savories' in North America.

    June 18, 2012

  • The word 'pools' is also part of the verb 'to pool. 'Water pools in low places on that road'.

    June 15, 2012

  • 'Also, in the Yorkshire dialect 'oft' means 'far away'.

    June 9, 2012

  • An 'oftcumden' is a person who has come from 'oft', far away, and probably speaks with a different accent. In some communities in the North of England, a person may still be an 'oftcumden' after living there many years.

    June 9, 2012

  • An 'oftcumden' is a person who has 'come from 'oft'. An outsider. In some communities in the North of England, a person might still be an 'oftcumden' after living there many years.

    June 9, 2012

  • There is also a verb 'to varicose', with the inflections 'varicoses', 'varicosing' and 'varicosed'. It refers to the process by which healthy veins become 'varicose' veins.

    June 8, 2012

  • 'knicker' is the adjectival form of 'knickers'. We used to replace 'knicker elastic'.

    June 8, 2012

  • There are several words that combine with 'favor' in American English that are spelled 'favour' in British English. Although several of both versions appear in Wordnik, at the time of this entry neither 'favor' nor some of the others 'unfavorable' 'unfavourable' are cross-referenced.

    The spellchecker on this facility appears to 'favour' the British English version!

    June 6, 2012

  • As in many of the examples, 'togethers' usually only occurs as the plural of the compound noun 'get-together'. They might have a 'get-together' to celebrate, and students and families may have many 'get-togethers'. Wordnik lists both.

    June 6, 2012

  • There is a noun 'gruelling' with the plural 'gruellings'. If the police interrogate someone intensely we may say that they gave him a 'gruelling'. If that happens more than once they are 'gruellings'.

    June 5, 2012

  • In the UK a 'divan' is usually a normal height single bed on castors, without a headboard or foot board. There may be drawers in the section under the mattress.

    Both of my divans have a sprung mattress and the base is also sprung but not to the same standard. One can sleep fairly comfortably on the base and so allow someone else to use the mattress.

    June 5, 2012

  • Noun: 'gozunder' 'gozunders'. A 'gozunder' is a 'potty', 'chamber', 'chamberpot' that goes (or went) under the bed, because it 'goes under'. We all had a 'gozunder' in the days to pass urine when the toilet, lavatory, rest room ... was not in the house.

    I still have a 'gozunder' that has lost its handle. It lives in a cupboard because it will not 'go under' my 'divan'. In the UK a 'divan' is not a sofa, it is a normal height single bed on castors, without a headboard or foot board.

    A 'gozunder' is useful when one feels sick, wants to throw up. Especially as one ages, it is also useful when someone else is using the bathroom, wash room, ...

    June 5, 2012

  • The word 'galls' is also the plural of the noun 'gall' as clearly recognised in the examples and photos.

    June 4, 2012

  • Presumably, 'focusses' is also the plural of the noun 'focus'. However, 'focal lengths' would usually be used.

    June 4, 2012

  • There is the parallel verb 'crystalise' which is listed, but with the present participle 'crystalising' that is currently not listed here.

    June 3, 2012

  • gripe Babies can have a 'gripeing pain' when they have 'gripe'. 'Gripeing' in this use is an adjective but it is also a present participle of the verb 'to gripe'.

    June 1, 2012

  • Babies can have a 'gripeing' pain when they have 'gripe', a singular noun.

    June 1, 2012

  • The verb 'to statement' has the inflections 'statements', statementing' which is in Wordnik, and 'statemented'. It refers to the process in the UK and probably beyond whereby a school is required to prepare a statement of special educational need (SEN) when appropriate.

    May 28, 2012

  • At children's camps in the 1940's when we had to dig our own trenches, and more recently they referred to them as lats.

    May 22, 2012

  • Part of the verbs 'to prize'.

    March 25, 2012

  • Also, as a verb 'he or she bans ...'. 'They have a regulation, it bans ...'.

    March 19, 2012

  • Part of the verb 'to wipe'.

    March 15, 2012

  • The blacksmith shoes the horses. For the verb 'to shoe'.

    March 12, 2012

  • He, she or it shelters ...

    March 12, 2012

  • Please help me. There are many different kinds of behavior, behaviour' the spell-checker prefers the UK version!.

    I would like to know how best to describe these units as a kind of phrase. They are not noun or verb phrases, nor do they sound like prepositional phrases.

    We may talk of 'addictive (behavior, behaviour'); dependent (behavior, behaviour'); dysfunctional (behavior, behaviour'); family (behavior, behaviour'); group (behavior, behaviour') ...

    Thank you.

    February 27, 2012

  • Also 3rd person singular of the verb to spend.

    February 16, 2012

  • 'Unforgiveness' is the form that I hear on Christian radio in the UK and use myself. I do not remember hearing 'unforgivingness' though that would seem to have a similar meaning.

    November 25, 2011

  • Also past and past participle of the verb 'to uncover'.

    November 24, 2011

  • Also past and perfect of the verb 'to uncouple'.

    November 24, 2011

  • Also the past tense, or past participle of the verb 'to unchain'.

    November 24, 2011

  • Also 3rd person singular of the verb 'to trick'.

    November 21, 2011

  • Also 3rd person singular of the verb 'to treat'.

    November 21, 2011

  • 'Opportunity cost' is an adjectival use.

    November 14, 2011

  • I like this word with the meanings that I give it, below.
    I find 'nouse' useful and use it to encourage people and to find out more of their strengths.
    If you suggest that someone uses their 'nouse' to do something difficult you imply that they have sufficient of whatever that would take.
    That affirms strengths in that person of which you, or even they, may not yet be aware.
    The people that I use 'nouse' with usually seem to grasp sufficient of what I mean. That is probably from the contexts in which I use it.
    The full significance of what you have asked them to do may dawn on you when they demonstrate unexpected skills, or on them, perhaps as they achieve something later.
    My meanings use it as a singular noun. 'Common sense, your wits. "What it takes."' I also accept and commend the Urban dictionary's (www.urbandictionary.com) offering of 'practical skills', because practical skills also require good understanding.

    November 14, 2011

  • As an adjective, they talk of a 'niche market for ...'

    November 13, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to excise'. 'He excises lesions that could become cancerous.'

    November 8, 2011

  • A common adjectival use 'an eternity ring.'

    November 7, 2011

  • My original post was an implied question to which you have collectively given an answer that is 'no', thank you.
    "In as much as the word includes the ideas of the 'processes and results of' being pleasing to the eye, it also seems to have a use as a singular noun. 'She is elegant!'"

    November 6, 2011

  • It sounds as though it might also be used as a singular noun. 'That river is tidal for many miles.'

    October 31, 2011

  • Is it not also a present participle of the verb 'to ticket'? If the police were "ticketing speeders on Lauderdale" Road (see @hawkstv opposite), that sounds to me more like a verbal use than a noun.

    October 31, 2011

  • It is also used as a pronoun, as in some of the examples on this page. 'They described the mountain and went thither.'

    October 31, 2011

  • Also, as an adjective. 'They had to study on their own, but had a taught class each week.'

    October 27, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to swing'. 'She swings on the garden swing every day in the holidays.'

    October 24, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to surprise'. 'He always surprises his mother with the originality of his work.'

    October 23, 2011

  • Also, simple past of the verb 'to stud'. 'They studded the belts in time for the parade.'

    October 20, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to store'. 'He even stores his food supplies in the bath.'

    October 19, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to stick'. 'You could see if the paper sticks to that surface.'

    October 18, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to stare'. 'She stares at me and I don't like it.'

    October 17, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'They often use a smear campaign to discredit a politician.'

    October 10, 2011

  • Also, present participle of the verb 'to smart'. 'My knee was smarting after I fell off my bike.'

    October 9, 2011

  • Probably because when I first went to school we had slates on which to write, 'to slate' someone was to write their name on a slate for wrongdoing.

    'Slated' implied public recognition that you had done something wrong that they would write on the slate for all to see.

    October 9, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to sip'. 'He should sip all his drinks until his mouth heals.'

    October 8, 2011

  • Also, present participle of the verb 'to sight'. 'They were sighting the object when there was an explosion.'

    October 7, 2011

  • It is also the past of the verb 'to shut'. 'The door shut behind me before I could ...'

    October 7, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to shrug'. 'When she shrugs her shoulders like that I take it that she is not interested.'

    October 7, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to shrink'. 'If the wool shrinks in the hot water, you will not be able to wear that jumper again.'

    October 6, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to schedule'. 'They will schedule the meetings soon.'

    September 20, 2011

  • Add, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to saw'. 'He usually saws the wood for the fire.'

    September 19, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to rush'. 'They must rush her to hospital.'

    September 19, 2011

  • In IT they talk about 'run time', the time when the program is operating, running. That could happen at run time.'

    September 19, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to reuse'. 'You must reuse those bags.'

    September 18, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to request'. 'He always requests music.'

    September 18, 2011

  • Also, the 3rd person singular of the verb 'to pump'. 'The heart pumps the blood around the body.'

    September 16, 2011

  • Also, present participle of the verb 'to plow (to plough)'.

    September 15, 2011

  • Also, the simple past or past participle of the verb 'to plaster'. 'They plastered the walls last week.'

    September 15, 2011

  • Also 3rd person singular of the verb 'to note'.

    September 13, 2011

  • Also 3rd person singular of the verb 'to nail'. 'As he nails the notice to the fence he will ...'

    September 13, 2011

  • Also 3rd person singular of the verb 'to murder'.

    September 13, 2011

  • It is also the plural of the noun 'a mention'. 'The soldier had another mention in a despatch. He has now had 3 mentions.'
    'A mention in a despatch' implies an unusually good report in the UK armed forces.

    September 12, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to mate'.

    September 12, 2011

  • It is important to distinguish the 2 verbs 'lie/lies/lying/lay/lain' which is about position and 'lie/lies/lying/lied' which is about telling what is untrue.

    September 8, 2011

  • Really? "All persons, singular and plural, present form of know."
    'I knows, you knows, ... we knows. you knows, they knows?' I know of no use for any of those.

    September 7, 2011

  • As a plural only noun. Knitted clothes. 'When the weather gets cold we get out our knits.'

    September 7, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to judge'. 'He judges' cases of fraud.

    September 7, 2011

  • It is also 3rd person singular of the verb 'to joke'. Do not worry about what he says 'he jokes!'. OED does not appear to have an entry 'jokes', though it uses the word on the page about 'joke'.

    September 7, 2011

  • In the Olympics and similar events we say that they have 'a heat' or 'heats' to decide who will compete in the finals. This use of 'heat' as a noun does not appear in OED!

    September 5, 2011

  • It is also the 3rd person singular of the verb 'to guard'.

    September 5, 2011

  • It is also 3rd person singular of of the verb 'to growl'.

    September 5, 2011

  • It is the 3rd person singular of the verb 'to glue'.

    September 4, 2011

  • Also, 3rd person singular of the verb 'to flood'.

    September 4, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'The sometimes call the facing board the fascia.'

    September 3, 2011

  • The 3rd person singular of the verb 'to exchange'. 'He, she, it exchanges.'

    September 2, 2011

  • The 3rd person singular of the verb 'to estimate': 'he or she estimates.'

    September 2, 2011

  • From the verb 'to escape' 3rd person singular 'he, she, it escapes.'

    September 2, 2011

  • 3rd person singular of the verb to drip 'the tap drips'.

    August 31, 2011

  • Surely this is a verb 'it (sugar, salt) dissolves in water'?

    August 31, 2011

  • 3rd person singular and present indicative of the verb 'to comb' isn't it? Oxford English Dictionary does not seem to mention it either!

    August 28, 2011

  • It is also 3rd person singular of the verb 'to clap'.

    August 28, 2011

  • What about the verb?

    August 28, 2011

  • What about the verbal use?

    August 28, 2011

  • In August I said 'Builds is a verb not a noun. '
    Thank you Bilby for your example of builds as a noun.
    I would better have said 'builds is more usually a verb than a noun'.

    August 27, 2011

  • 'The Pope (will be, was, is) blessing the people' are verbal uses.

    August 27, 2011

  • People are so consumed with the bargains that they want to sell or buy that the noun forms dominate on the 'Web'. However the process of bargaining continues in large parts of the globe where she bargains (using bargains as a verb) every time she goes to market.

    August 27, 2011

  • An MS Word 'all research sites' search of 'balances' gives examples of this as a plural only noun, and a website of the name. From the examples on this page there seems to be just this very old one: '"lots of metal objects such as balances, iron plates, handles ...”' Interactive Dig Sagalassos 2003 - Lower Agora Report 2.
    It appears to be a word that, though still probably well known from science education in schools, does not feature much in conversation and literature.

    August 27, 2011

  • It is also part of the verb 'to arrest'.

    August 26, 2011

  • There are examples of the use as a verb in the examples.

    August 26, 2011

  • My use as a verb: 'The noise of the fireworks alarms the children and the animals.'

    August 26, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'Have you done any muscle toning exercises?'

    August 25, 2011

  • I notice that the Oxford English Dictionary only recognises a noun use of this word. http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/198377?redirectedFrom=teaming#eid

    August 25, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'They were getting chilled in the stiffening wind.'

    August 24, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'Are you on the stewarding team?'

    August 24, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'Take those squabbling children for a swim.'

    August 24, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'You need to cut the wick of the spluttering candle.'

    August 24, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'You need to wait for the slackening tide.'

    August 24, 2011

  • In the UK 'to skive' is more often (not attending, being absent, malingering or bunking off) from work or school. These ideas are in the examples but not in the definitions.

    August 24, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'She had a sickling episode and they called the emergency ambulance.'

    August 24, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'The shrivelling trees will soon die.'

    August 24, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'He enjoys the scouting activities.'

    August 24, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'They used a roving microphone.'

    August 24, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'They were terrified by the rocketing prices.'

    August 24, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'You need to keep clear of a reviving lion!'

    August 24, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'You may need a self-replicating system.'

    August 24, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'A magnet has a magnetic and repelling force.'

    August 24, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'The remitting customer must pay the fee.'

    August 24, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'He is a nuisance but his redeeming feature is that he makes us laugh.'

    August 24, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'The council provides recycling bags.'

    August 24, 2011

  • A midwife might say to a colleague 'I had two quickenings today.' She would mean that two of her ante-natal patients had reported feeling the first movements of their unborn babies. This often happens about 20 weeks into the pregnancy.

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'He loves the sound of his purring engine.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'That would be a computer programming language.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'I don't use a food processing machine.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'Every preacher has a preaching style.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'The rain fell on the posing bride.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My use of 'ponding' as a noun: 'Ponding on a flat roof may cause the roof to fail.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'I need some plumbing work done.'

    August 23, 2011

  • I associate pillaging with looting (stealing from shops and other places that have already been damaged) , setting on fire and destroying.

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'They caught the pickpocketing students.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'Rather than saying 'the persisting people' they would say, 'the persistent people'.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'Currently there are too many persecuting groups.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'There was a perishing wind.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'They have courses in the performing arts.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'If you have a car you need a parking place.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'A continually pacifying parent may need to learn how to discipline.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'The overseeing officer is responsible.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My use of 'overloading' as a noun: 'You have to watch for overloading.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'You might say that they fought 'their oppressing rulers', but 'their oppressive rulers' would be better.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'The nurse treated the oozing wound.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'The students laughed at their ogling friend.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'Although you could say 'the observing person' you might mean the 'observant person', the one who notices.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'They are such a nitpicking group!'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'They put a netting cover over the fruit.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'They were annoyed by the mumbling speakers.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My two adjectival uses: 'The mounting anger led to fighting.' 'The mounting debt is causing huge problems.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'Hand me the mooring rope.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'Would you rescue the moaning man?'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'Send the misbehaving children to the head teacher.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'The Bible says that the Holy Spirit is a ministering spirit.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'There is a messaging programme on this phone.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'The room was full of maturing cheese.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'He did not recognise the masquerading guests.'

    August 23, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'Although unusual, it is a dwelling house.'

    August 22, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'They may use a duplicating machine or a printer.'

    August 22, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'Droning planes annoy me.'

    August 22, 2011

  • My adjectival use: 'These dribbling dogs make such a mess.'

    August 22, 2011

Show 126 more comments...