Advanced Encryption Standard love

Advanced Encryption Standard

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A data encryption scheme which uses three different key sizes (128-bit, 192-bit, and 256-bit). AES was adopted by the U.S. government in 2002 as the encryption standard for protecting sensitive but unclassified electronic data.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The security features include a new instruction set for faster data encryption and decryption called Advanced Encryption Standard - New Instructions (AES-NI).

    PCWorld

  • NET Framework for managed code; as a government encryption standard, this algorithm is also known as Advanced Encryption Standard, or AES.

    The Code Project Latest Articles

  • For servers, Westmere also adds a new instruction set for faster data encryption and decryption called Advanced Encryption Standard (AES).

    Macworld

  • As part of vPro, the new Core i5 and Core i7 chips will take advantage of a new instruction called Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) for faster data encryption and decryption.

    ARN News

  • Westmere adds a new instruction set for faster encryption and decryption of data called Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), Skaugen said.

    Netflash

  • It also helps to develop encryption standards such as Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) that are used by all of us.

    PC Authority

  • In particular, they recommended using a method such as Advanced Encryption Standard, or AES (define).

    InternetNews Realtime News for IT Managers

  • Fifteen candidates and three-and-a-half years later, Rijndael became the new Advanced Encryption Standard — AES.

    America's Next Top Hash Function Begins

  • There were 15 submissions from 10 countries -- I was part of the group that submitted Twofish -- and after four years of analysis and cryptanalysis, NIST chose the algorithm Rijndael to become the Advanced Encryption Standard (.pdf), or AES.

    An American Idol for Crypto Geeks

  • A perfect example of this is the Advanced Encryption Standard algorithm, which governments and financial institutions around the world use to secure data.

    "Secure e-voting" is not an oxymoron.

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