Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Pelusian mouth, turns towards the East; the second of the ways goes towards the West, and this is called the Canobic mouth; but that one of the ways which is straight runs thus, — when the river in its course downwards comes to the point of the Delta, then it cuts the Delta through the midst and so issues out to the sea.

    The History of Herodotus

  • Alexander upon this immediately rose up and went to Pharos, which, at that time, was an island lying a little above the Canobic mouth of the river Nile, though it has now been joined to the main land by a mole.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • Egypt itself, and in Egypt to that which is now named the Canobic mouth of the Nile and to Taricheiai.

    The History of Herodotus

  • Canobic mouth, or if it were not possible to sail by reason of contrary winds, then he had to carry his cargo round the head of the Delta in boats to Naucratis: thus highly was Naucratis privileged.

    The history of Herodotus — Volume 1

  • Paari-sheps, or Prosopis, which lay between the Canobic and Sebennytic branches of the Nile, commencing at the point of their separation.

    Ancient Egypt

  • Canobic branch of the Nile, to which the Poet makes Menelaus have recourse.

    A New System; or, an Analysis of Antient Mythology. Volume II. (of VI.)

  • Now in old times Naucratis alone was an open trading - place, and no other place in Egypt: and if any one came to any other of the Nile mouths, he was compelled to swear that he came not thither of his own will, and when he had thus sworn his innocence he had to sail with his ship to the Canobic mouth, or if it were not possible to sail by reason of contrary winds, then he had to carry his cargo round the head of the Delta in boats to

    The History of Herodotus

  • Now in old times Naucratis alone was an open trading-place, and no other place in Egypt: and if any one came to any other of the Nile mouths, he was compelled to swear that he came not thither of his own will, and when he had thus sworn his innocence he had to sail with his ship to the Canobic mouth, or if it were not possible to sail by reason of contrary winds, then he had to carry his cargo round the head of the Delta in boats to Naucratis: thus highly was Naucratis privileged.

    An Account of Egypt: Being the Second Book of His Histories Called Euterpe. Paras. 60-77

  • And the priests told me, when I inquired, that the things concerning Helen happened thus: —Alexander having carried off Helen was sailing away from Sparta to his own land, and when he had come to the Egean Sea contrary winds drove him from his course to the Sea of Egypt; and after that, since the blasts did not cease to blow, he came to Egypt itself, and in Egypt to that which is now named the Canobic mouth of the Nile and to Taricheiai.

    An Account of Egypt: Being the Second Book of His Histories Called Euterpe. Paras. 40-59

  • Helen happened thus: -- Alexander having carried off Helen was sailing away from Sparta to his own land, and when he had come to the Egean Sea contrary winds drove him from his course to the Sea of Egypt; and after that, since the blasts did not cease to blow, he came to Egypt itself, and in Egypt to that which is now named the Canobic mouth of the Nile and to Taricheiai.

    An Account of Egypt

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.