Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • Cowper, William 1731-1800. British poet considered a precursor of romanticism. His best-known work, The Task (1785), praises rural life and leisure.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. An English surname, a variant of Cooper.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. English surgeon who discovered Cowper's gland (1666-1709)
  • n. English poet who wrote hymns and poetry about nature (1731-1800)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Wilson points out that in Cowper's The Taska paradigm for the sentimental construction of nature in the later eighteenth centurythe sofa is the site of "female industry" (165) that the narrator turns from "to the serious business of composing poetry outdoors among real flowers" (168).

    'Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star' as an Ambient Poem; a Study of a Dialectical Image; with Some Remarks on Coleridge and Wordsworth

  • But he who dodges hospitals and jails, and walks fast crossing graveyards, and would rather talk of operas than hell; calls Cowper, Young,

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • Act of Parliament was what was known as the Cowper-Temple Clause: "No religious catechism or religious formulary which is distinctive of any particular denomination shall be taught in the school."

    Thomas Henry Huxley; A Sketch Of His Life And Work

  • The final result of the dispute as codified in the Act of Parliament was what was known as the Cowper-Temple Clause: “No religious catechism or religious formulary which is distinctive of any particular denomination shall be taught in the school.”

    Thomas Henry Huxley A Sketch Of His Life And Work

  • For the first fifty or sixty years of the century that we are recalling Cowper was the most popular poet of our country, with Burns and Byron for rivals.

    Immortal Memories

  • Just in front of the prostate gland are two small bodies, known as Cowper's glands.

    Plain facts for old and young : embracing the natural history and hygiene of organic life.

  • But he who dodges hospitals and jails, and walks fast crossing graveyards, and would rather talk of operas than hell; calls Cowper, Young, Pascal, Rousseau, poor devils all of sick men; and throughout a care-free lifetime swears by Rabelais as passing wise, and therefore jolly; -- not that man is fitted to sit down on tomb-stones, and break the green damp mould with unfathomably wondrous Solomon.

    Moby Dick, or, the whale

  • She had the best of it; as she joyfully confessed to herself, seeing the glorious breaking waves and watching the play of light on them, and recalling Cowper's words --

    Nobody

  • But he who dodges hospitals and jails, and walks fast crossing grave - yards, and would rather talk of operas than hell; calls Cowper, Young, Pascal, Rousseau, poor devils all of sick men; and throughout a care-free lifetime swears by Rabelais as passing wise, and therefore jolly; -- not that man is fitted to sit down on tomb-stones, and break the green damp mould with unfathomably wondrous Solomon.

    Moby-Dick, or, The Whale

  • 'Cowper's hand did not tremble in writing the lines; why should my voice falter in repeating them?

    Shirley, by Charlotte Bronte

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