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Etymologies

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Examples

  • In collating his observations, Marsham, a friend of the more famous naturalist Gilbert White, crystallised a British fascination.

    Spring's here: skylarks overhead, moles in the garden, moths in the bathroom

  • English naturalist Gilbert White was the author of "The Natural History of Selborne".

    Weatherwatch: An ominous barometer and a north wind

  • "I observed a blue mist, smelling strongly of sulphur, hanging along our sloping woods, and seeming to indicate that thunder was at hand," writes Gilbert White, in The Natural History of Selborne 1788.

    Weatherwatch: An ominous barometer and a north wind

  • This is a work of natural history, focusing on detailed observations of the immediate environment, and written by Gilbert White.

    Information, Culture, Policy, Education: Weblogs

  • Gilbert White was given a clutch of two nightjar eggs—White, Journals, p.

    A Year on the Wing

  • In August 1786 Gilbert White had a young nightjar—Ibid., pp.

    A Year on the Wing

  • Gilbert White feels a nightjar singing—Gilbert White, letter XXII, 1769, in White, p.

    A Year on the Wing

  • This is like Gilbert White or Coleridge, but it is also like Ted Hughes or J. A. Baker, author of The Peregrine, the hallucinatory account of a winter watching or imagining—no one could or can tell—hunting peregrines along the coast of East Anglia.

    A Year on the Wing

  • Gilbert White feels a nightjar singing when drinking tea with his neighbors in a straw “hermitage” in Selborne, his village, surrounded by beech woods, heath, and farmland in Hampshire, in southern England.

    A Year on the Wing

  • Down below, the street names, the buildings, the shipyards and cemeteries are all full of ghost lives that have passed: Ezra Pound went there; Odysseus sailed by; Molly Bloom was from there and remembered its “Moorish wall”; Gilbert White knew his “soft-billed” and “short-winged” birds of passage went through there, but its people today and the people who go there seem broken and vague.

    A Year on the Wing

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