Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of Hellene.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Thus the several Hellenic tribes (and I mean by the term Hellenes those who, while forming separate communities, had a common language, and were afterwards called by a common name) ,5 owing to their weakness and isolation, were never united in any great enterprise before the Trojan War.

    The History of the Peloponnesian War

  • The vast chasm separating this "second race" from the ancient Hellenes is glibly denoted by the use of the modifier "modern" in the title Modern Greece.

    The Ruins of Empire: Nationalism, Art, and Empire in Hemans's Modern Greece

  • It was not till Hellen and his sons grew strong in Phthiotis, and were invited as allies into the other cities, that one by one they gradually acquired from the connection the name of Hellenes; though a long time elapsed before that name could fasten itself upon all.

    THE LANDMARK THUCYDIDES

  • The Romans then marched southward to Attica and informed the Greeks that they had come to ` ` deliver the Hellenes from the Macedonian yoke. ''

    The Story of Mankind

  • In the New Testament the Greek word Hellenes, meaning literally

    Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • But when Hellen and his sons became powerful in Phthiotis, their aid was invoked by other cities, and those who associated with them gradually began to be called Hellenes, though a long time elapsed before the name prevailed over the whole country.

    The History of the Peloponnesian War

  • There is no way to confirm the number of followers, but leaders of the very loosely organized movement, commonly referred to as the Hellenes or the Dodecatheon, after the 12 gods of the Greek pantheon, say there are maybe 2,000 hard-core practicing followers, and perhaps 100,000 nationwide who are open to the ideas and pursue some sort of interest.

    Letter From Greece: The Gods Return to Olympus

  • Pharandates the son of Teaspis a Persian, coming over of her own free will from the enemy, who when she perceived that the Persians had been destroyed and that the Hellenes were the victors, descended from her carriage and came up to the Lacedemonians while they were yet engaged in the slaughter.

    The History of Herodotus

  • Wherefore Hellenes do not like to call Hellenes slaves, but confine the term to barbarians.

    Politics

  • - (2) It is used with reference to that which first brought things into existence; for it is thus that some are called Hellenes by race and others

    Metaphysics

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