Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • Strindberg, (Johan) August 1849-1912. Swedish writer of novels and plays, including Miss Julie (1888) and The Dance of Death (1901), which are noted for their psychological realism.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. Swedish dramatist and novelist (1849-1912)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • As a contemporary of Nobel, Strindberg is most likely right when he points out that the adjective idealistic is something else than the adjective ideal and incompatible with the will.

    Topping Shakespeare? Aspects of the Nobel Prize for Literature

  • What Strindberg is referring to is the fact that Alfred Nobel had stipulated in his will in 1895 that the Nobel prize for literature should be awarded to the person who had produced "the most outstanding work in an ideal direction".

    Topping Shakespeare? Aspects of the Nobel Prize for Literature

  • Strindberg, which would hardly be possible in any case; she emphasises it, though, it may be by a warning instinct rather than by deliberate intention, she carefully avoids calling Strindberg a "vivisector," using instead the less appropriate term "dissector."

    Impressions and Comments

  • The Dream on Monkey Mountain (1967) belongs to the twentieth-century genre called dream plays, connected with works by playwrights such as Strindberg as well as by Synge and Soyinka.

    A Single, Homeless, Circling Satellite: Derek Walcott, 1992 Nobel Literature Laureate

  • Afterward came theater in Mexico, where he directed 100 shows ranging from Ionesco to Strindberg and co-founded the "Theater of Panic" movement.

    Confessions of a Radical Mind

  • On the menu: adaptations of Chekhov and August Strindberg, as well as a musical about director Julie Taymor's travails with the Broadway musical "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark."

    Ideas Calendar: Aug. 13-19

  • August Strindberg drew inspiration for his novel 'The Red Room' here, where rich met poor in a theatrical and electric environment.

    In Stockholm, the Old Holds the New

  • Sweden bequeathed to the world brilliant but often overlooked writers such as Hjalmar Söderberg, Vilhelm Moberg, August Strindberg and Selma Lagerlöf.

    Tattooed by Politics

  • August Strindberg drew inspiration for his novel "The Red Room" here, where rich met poor in a theatrical and electric environment.

    Stockholm: Swede Emotion

  • Thursday evening, the normally stark, white walls of the Guggenheim in New York City pulsed with the images of Alice in Wonderland's neon purple cheshire cat, a hot pink balloon tormenting Strindberg, a maze of arms, and more.

    YouTube Play Exhibit Unveiled At Guggenheim Bash: See The Top 25 Videos

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