Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A light bedstead used by the Arabs, consisting of a simple framework set upon legs and covered with a network of green rawhide which hardens to the tightness of a drum when dry. On this is laid the mat.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A shallow packing-case, lined with tin, containing my gun, was fastened in the centre of the angarep, and two towlines were attached to the front part of the raft, by which swimmers were to draw it across the river.

    In the Heart of Africa

  • We laid him gently upon my angarep, which I had raised by four men, so that we could lower him gradually from the kneeling camel, and we carried him to the camp, about thirty yards distant.

    In the Heart of Africa

  • At the end of that time we arranged an angarep comfortably upon a camel, upon which he was transported to Geera, in company with a long string of camels, heavily laden with dried meat and squares of hide for shields, with large bundles of hippopotamus skin for whip-making, together with the various spoils of the chase.

    In the Heart of Africa

  • He sat upon an angarep, surrounded by his people; lying on either side upon his seat were two brace of pistols, and within a few yards stood his horse ready saddled.

    In the Heart of Africa

  • A general shout of exclamation arose from the assembled crowd, and taking my seat upon an angarep, I was immediately shouldered by a number of men, and, attended by ten of my people as escort, I was carried toward the camp of the great Kamrasi.

    In the Heart of Africa

  • A sixth rifle I kept in my hands while I sat upon the angarep, with Richarn and Saat both with double-barrelled guns behind me.

    In the Heart of Africa

  • Many of the porters had gone on ahead with the baggage, and I started off a man in haste to recall an angarep upon which to carry her and also for a bag with a change of clothes, as we had dragged her through the river.

    In the Heart of Africa

  • I immediately ordered an angarep (travelling bedstead) to be placed outside the tent under a large tree.

    In the Heart of Africa

  • However, I set to work and fitted an angarep with arched hoops from end to end, so as to form a frame like the cap of a wagon.

    In the Heart of Africa

  • This I covered with two waterproof Abyssinian tanned hides securely strapped, and lashing two long poles parallel to the sides of the angarep, I formed an excellent palanquin.

    In the Heart of Africa

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.