Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of audacity.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In his short story "An Outpost of Progress," Joseph Conrad wrote that "few men realize that their life, the very essence of their character, their capabilities and their audacities, are only the expression of their belief in the safety of their surroundings."

    Two Paths, Little Glory For This Polish Director

  • It was like strong drink, firing him to audacities of feeling, — a drug that laid hold of his imagination and went cloud-soaring through the sky.

    Chapter 2

  • This was a mere bugbear of mankind's addled fancy; and, by stinging audacities of thought and speech, by vivid slang that bit home by sheerest intimacy into his listeners 'mental processes, he drove the bugbear from their brains, showed them the loving clarity of God's design, and, thereby, induced in them spiritual serenity and calm.

    WHEN ALICE TOLD HER SOUL

  • His audacities of phrase struck him as grotesque, his felicities of expression were monstrosities, and everything was absurd, unreal, and impossible.

    Chapter 17

  • When I first read him I was dazzled by his audacities.

    Archive 2009-04-01

  • In his criticism over the years, Greenberg created, as much as anybody, the New York art world's almost arrogantly self-confident sense of itself as the place where the tradition of modern art remained secure — where the disturbing audacities offered Parisian audiences by Courbet, Manet, and the artists in their wake a hundred years earlier could be perpetuated.

    An Eye on the Tremors

  • It is obvious that he perceived that Björnson had carried a very spirited raid into his own particular province, and he was determined to drive this audacious enemy back by means of greater audacities.

    Henrik Ibsen

  • "Looking over the list, I see that my taste remains centered on similar directorial audacities, from the depth compositions of Steven Soderbergh's hi-def Bubble to the sheer delirium of Darren Aronofsky's The Fountain - the first Minnellian science-fiction movie."

    GreenCine Daily: Lists, 12/21.

  • Who but Conrad, the impoverished Polish aristocrat who made himself England's greatest living writer after a modest sea-going career, can authoritatively inform us that "few men realize that their life, the very essence of their character, their capabilities and their audacities, are only the expression of their belief in the safety of their surroundings"?

    A Literary Look

  • I can't dispel that suspicion in general; a feeling for eloquence is likely to be gratified by sudden gestures, flares of spirit, words breaking free from every expectation, audacities of diction and syntax.

    'On Eloquence'

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