Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The concept, amongst most Christians, that the works of the Holy Spirit (speaking in tongues, prophecy, healing, and miracles) ceased at some point in history

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The term cessationism in this article refers to the idea that all the miraculous gifts practiced by the early church have been suspended for the duration of the present age.

    SharperIron

  • One of the lesser arguments for cessationism is the virtual absence of tongues-speaking from the apostolic period until the middle of the nineteenth century.

    SharperIron

  • See below for my explanatory hypothesis for this decline of cessationism among progressive dispensationalists.

    SharperIron

  • More narrowly, it is a brief case for the cessationism of tongues (though the basic principles in this article extend to other miraculous gifts).

    SharperIron

  • The following, then, is a brief case for cessationism.

    SharperIron

  • The case for the cessationism of revelatory gifts has been, I believe, objectively convincing for years.

    SharperIron

  • Works defending cessationism continue to emerge, but even these seem to feel pressure not only to affirm the evangelical credentials of continuationists, but also to recognize the contribution of continuationism to evangelicalism and even to concede certain aspects of continuationism.

    SharperIron

  • It begins by defining several key terms and establishing a historical setting, and then offers some objective, exegetical/theological reasons why the doctrine of cessationism should be maintained.

    SharperIron

  • In these words lies a third and final reason for pressing a defense of cessationism today, one that penetrates to the heart of my concern, namely, that the practice of tongues (and all revelatory gifts) is not so innocuous and peripheral to the

    SharperIron

  • I do allow for the possibility that this passage argues for cessationism in the present age; however, I am also keenly aware that the two interpretations that argue thusly are minority positions that must compete with a formidable alternative interpretation that is held by the majority.

    SharperIron

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.