Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having a face in which the nasal bone is higher at the nose than at the stop: applied to dogs. This peculiarity is frequently seen in pointers. Vero Shaw, Book of the Dog.
  • Having a round flattish face, like a reversed plate: said of persons.
  • Said of a horse in which the profile of the face is concave.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Desperation may have clouded my judgment, for I ended up with a seven-year-old mare, a dish-faced sorrel pinto out of a quarter horse mare by a local Arabian stallion.

    Healed by Horses

  • "You will have your little joke, Doctor," smiled Miss Hopkins, a dish-faced blonde with a cultured expression.

    A Woman Named Smith

  • "That dish-faced pinto on the off side," remarked the driver, "can outrun anything in this town for fun, money, or marbles."

    Ruggles of Red Gap

  • Having waited till it was finished, he had, for his own private amusement, taken it to a nice hillside, and was now coasting on it all alone by the light of a good-humored, dish-faced moon.

    The Farmer Boy, and How He Became Commander-In-Chief

  • Stop -- There is a gradual, slight, barely perceptible stop, avoiding a down or dish-faced appearance.

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  • So .. forget that I called ya’ll liberals dish-faced morons. on June 2, 2008 at 9: 28 pm | Reply I'm Also Clouseau

    Get In Line « POLICE INSPECTOR BLOG

  • Egyptians, Asiatics, Romans all have gods, but these dish-faced ones with beards refuse to pay honor to Caesar and scorn the gods. "

    The Coming of the King

  • A little dish-faced woman in rusty black, and with whitish curls surmounted by a faded blue velvet bonnet laid flat on top of her head, had the floor: "Mr. Chairman -- I mean Miss Chairman -- the object of our meeting this evening is, Shall marriage in the Consolidated

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 12, No. 28, July, 1873

  • As I can beat you at tennis, though you are six years older than I, so I can beat you in other matters, and with the Queen herself, even though she is half in love with you already, as all the court is saying; and she shall belong to me some day, though I have to slay that dish-faced prayer-master of a king to get her. "

    Via Crucis

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