Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as divan.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a Muslim council chamber or law court
  • n. a Muslim council of state
  • n. a collection of Persian or Arabic poems (usually by one author)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Completion of the reorganization of Sicily: clean sweep of private titles and royal privileges in the Norman manner; resumption of royal domain; destruction of private garrisons and feudal castles; ban on private war; criminal jurisdiction transferred from feudal to royal courts; towns deprived of magistrates and put under royal officers; clergy taxed and excluded from civil office; heavy influence of Muslim bureaucratic techniques, such as diwan, or financial office.

    1226

  • What appears advisable is that we should devote this introduction to a commentary on the poems here translated; which we call a "diwan," by the way, because they are selected out of all his works.

    The Diwan of Abu'l-Ala

  • Eat sitting at tables in gilded overstuffed dining room chairs, reclining on cushions in a diwan, or kneeling on a concrete floor around a sheet of plastic weighed down with bowls of kubba.

    Day of Honey

  • The Sultan on Saturday said he had replaced the minister of the royal office, the minister of the diwan of the royal court and the secretary-general of royal court affairs—three senior positions in the Arabian Peninsula monarchy.

    Oman Shuffles Cabinet Again, Amid Unrest

  • To his adherents, these traits multiplied their ardor; to the wider Arab public, they had the effect of a superb baklava served at a diwan—they persuaded a guest to stay long enough to listen to his host.

    A Privilege to Die

  • His vast marble diwan was colder than the hills outside.

    A Privilege to Die

  • If such cross-sectoral employment migration existed, it begs a number of other queries about the circulation of debt among firms and between them and the state, and about the origin and available labor pool for the diwan and sarishtadar institutions in the Afghan state fiscal structure.

    Connecting Histories in Afghanistan: Market Relations and State Formation on a Colonial Frontier

  • The divisions found in and between the diwan, sarishtadar, and mirza categories were often created and perpetuated by the individuals and alliances operating in the political realm, i.e., among the officials and office-holders who were both the instigators and targets of the audits.

    Connecting Histories in Afghanistan: Market Relations and State Formation on a Colonial Frontier

  • It deals with the question of whether the kinds of textual literacy necessary to function as an accountant for a Shikarpuri or Peshawri firm would have sufficiently enabled those with such knowledge and skills to function as a diwan or sarishtadar or mirza for the Durrani state.

    Connecting Histories in Afghanistan: Market Relations and State Formation on a Colonial Frontier

  • Hindus could circulate between the kinds of state fiscal service designated by the two terms, while Muslims do not figure into the diwan category.

    Connecting Histories in Afghanistan: Market Relations and State Formation on a Colonial Frontier

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