Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lit., end of the century; -- mostly used adjectively in English to signify: belonging to, or characteristic of, the close of the 19th century. At that time the phrase was also intended to imply “modern” or “up-to-date;” .

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • The end of the century: used attributively of anything that exhibits certain characteristics supposed to mark the closing years of the nineteenth century, regarded as a period of emancipation from the traditional social and moral order.
  • n. The end of the century: used attributively of anything that exhibits certain characteristics supposed to mark the closing years of the nineteenth century, regarded as a period of emancipation from the traditional social and moral order.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. relating to or characteristic of the end of a century (especially the end of the 19th century)

Etymologies

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  • I know a fiddle tune from Missouri called the "Findy Sickle Two-Step". I am guessing the title refers to 1899 and not 1999.

    October 18, 2010

  • with fins in them?

    Eew.

    January 6, 2009

  • Are these anything like pop siecles?

    January 5, 2009

  • LOL

    January 2, 2009

  • Bicycle enthusiast.

    January 2, 2009

  • Pertaining to the close of the 19th century, usually ascribed to the literary and artistic climate of modernism, world-weariness, and self-indulgence

    October 7, 2008