Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A standard or scale of measurement.
  • n. A standard dimension, quantity, or capacity.
  • n. An instrument for measuring or testing.
  • n. A means of estimating or evaluating; a test: a gauge of character. See Synonyms at standard.
  • n. Nautical The position of a vessel in relation to another vessel and the wind.
  • n. The distance between the two rails of a railroad.
  • n. The distance between two wheels on an axle.
  • n. The interior diameter of a shotgun barrel as determined by the number of lead balls of a size exactly fitting the barrel that are required to make one pound. Often used in combination: a 12-gauge shotgun.
  • n. The amount of plaster of Paris combined with common plaster to speed setting of the mixture.
  • n. Thickness or diameter, as of sheet metal or wire.
  • n. The fineness of knitted cloth as determined by the number of loops per 1 1/2 inches.
  • transitive v. To measure precisely.
  • transitive v. To determine the capacity, volume, or contents of.
  • transitive v. To evaluate or judge: gauge a person's ability.
  • transitive v. To adapt to a specified measurement.
  • transitive v. To mix (plaster) in specific proportions.
  • transitive v. To chip or rub (bricks or stones) to size.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A measure; a standard of measure; an instrument to determine dimensions, distance, or capacity; a standard
  • n. An act of measuring.
  • n. Any instrument for ascertaining or regulating the level, state, dimensions or forms of things; as, a rain gauge; a steam gauge.
  • n. A thickness of sheet metal or wire designated by any of several numbering schemes.
  • n. The distance between the rails of a railway.
  • n. A semi-norm; a function that assigns a non-negative size to all vectors in a vector space.
  • n. The number of stitches per inch, centimetre, or other unit of distance.
  • v. To measure or determine usually with a gauge; to measure the capacity, character, or ability of; to estimate; to judge of.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A measure; a standard of measure; an instrument to determine dimensions, distance, or capacity; a standard.
  • n. Measure; dimensions; estimate.
  • n. Any instrument for ascertaining or regulating the dimensions or forms of things; a templet or template.
  • n. Any instrument or apparatus for measuring the state of a phenomenon, or for ascertaining its numerical elements at any moment; -- usually applied to some particular instrument
  • n.
  • n. Relative positions of two or more vessels with reference to the wind.
  • n. The depth to which a vessel sinks in the water.
  • n. The distance between the rails of a railway.
  • n. The quantity of plaster of Paris used with common plaster to accelerate its setting.
  • n. That part of a shingle, slate, or tile, which is exposed to the weather, when laid; also, one course of such shingles, slates, or tiles.
  • transitive v. To measure or determine with a gauge.
  • transitive v. To measure or to ascertain the contents or the capacity of, as of a pipe, barrel, or keg.
  • transitive v. To measure the dimensions of, or to test the accuracy of the form of, as of a part of a gunlock.
  • transitive v. To draw into equidistant gathers by running a thread through it, as cloth or a garment.
  • transitive v. To measure the capacity, character, or ability of; to estimate; to judge of.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. etc. See gage, etc.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. determine the capacity, volume, or contents of by measurement and calculation
  • v. measure precisely and against a standard
  • n. the thickness of wire
  • n. a measuring instrument for measuring and indicating a quantity such as the thickness of wire or the amount of rain etc.
  • v. rub to a uniform size
  • v. mix in specific proportions
  • n. the distance between the rails of a railway or between the wheels of a train
  • n. diameter of a tube or gun barrel
  • v. judge tentatively or form an estimate of (quantities or time)
  • v. adapt to a specified measurement
  • n. accepted or approved instance or example of a quantity or quality against which others are judged or measured or compared

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old North French, gauging rod, of Germanic origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English gage, gaugen, from Anglo-Norman, Old Northern French gauger (compare Modern French jauger from Old French jaugier), from gauge ("gauging rod"), from Frankish *galga ("measuring rod, pole"), from Proto-Germanic *galgô (“pole, stake, cross”), from Proto-Indo-European *g'hAlgh-, *g'hAlg- (“perch, long switch”). Cognate with Old High German galgo, Old Frisian galga, Old English ġealga ("cross-beam, gallows"), Old Norse galgi ("cross-beam, gallows"), Old Norse gelgja ("pole, perch"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • HA HA HA!! Better than engouged, I guess...

    March 3, 2009

  • At least they'll be uniform about it.

    March 3, 2009

  • "My boyfriend has just proposed to me. Now we are engauged."

    March 3, 2009

  • I always have to strain against personal feelings to spell this word correctly. Gauge looks like gouge sounds, and deep inside, I've always wished it were guage, which feels truer to sound and reminds me of things like suede.

    July 11, 2008