Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of girle.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We found mariages great store both in townes and villages in many places where wee passed, of boyes of eight or ten yeeres, and girles of fiue or six yeeres old.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • The chiefe bootie the Tartars seeke for in all their warres is to get store of captiues; specially young boyes, and girles, whome they sell to the Turkes, or other their neighbours.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • As John Smith, in his "Description of New England," says: "Young boyes and girles, salvages or any other, be they never such idlers, may turne, carry, and returne fish without shame or either great pain: he is very idle that is past twelve years of age and cannot doe so much: and shee is very old that cannot spin a thread to catch them."

    The Old Coast Road From Boston to Plymouth

  • R.H. wife and four children the oldest ten the youngest thre the two eldest boys, the two youngest girles.

    Brook Farm

  • Muche loveth shee little tea-parties where onlie girles bee; and to have ye gentylmen come, aske: 'Damsylle, wherefore walke ye nott in gayer garmentes?'

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 1, July, 1862

  • And some day we will come home to the girles that's left alone

    The Real Dope

  • They accepted, fully expecting (after the austerity of his discourse) to be starved: "and the girles drank chocolette at no rate in the morning, for fear of the _worst_."

    From a Cornish Window A New Edition

  • We find him and his wife writing to Winthrop for help, buying Indians, sending home more than once to England for "godlye skylful paynstakeing girles," beseeching their neighbors to send them servants "of good caridg and godly conuersation;" and at last buying negroes, to try in every way to solve the vexed question.

    Customs and Fashions in Old New England

  • "Young boyes and girles, salvages, or any other, be they never such idlers may turne, carry, and returne fish without shame or either great pain: hee is very idle that is past twelve years of age and cannot doe so much: and shee is very old that cannot spin a thread to catch them."

    Home Life in Colonial Days

  • But I tried my girles Mercer and Barker singly one after another, a single song,

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Volume 52: April 1667

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