Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of horse.
  • v. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of horse.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The flanks of the horses are often sore from them, and I have seen men come in from chasing bullocks with their horses’ hind legs and quarters covered with blood.

    Chapter XIII. Trading-A British Sailor

  • The second posta on the road to Buenos Ayres stands on its banks; a little above there is a ford for horses, where the water does not reach to the horses’ belly; but from that point, in its course to the sea, it is quite impassable, and hence makes a most useful barrier against the Indians.

    Chapter VI

  • For prairie service, horses which have been raised exclusively upon grass, and never been fed on grain, or "_range horses_," as they are called in the West, are decidedly the best, and will perform more hard labor than those that have been stabled and groomed.

    The Prairie Traveler A Hand-book for Overland Expeditions

  • So saying, the Colonel leaped to the ground, directing his servant to cover the horses and then get out his valise; while the host, thus defeated, assumed the best grace he could to say that he would see what could be done “for the _horses_.”

    A Stable for Nightmares or Weird Tales

  • Thus it was always an eight - hour drive behind mountain horses from the alfalfa meadows (where I kept many Jersey cows) to the straggly village beside the big dry creek, where I caught the little narrow-gauge train.

    Chapter 8

  • AIGUY: No, the test for athleticism in horses is different.

    Bunny and a Book

  • No, the test for athleticism in horses is different.

    Bunny and a Book

  • Thus, it was always an eight-hour drive behind mountain horses from the alfalfa meadows (where I kept many Jersey cows) to the straggly village beside the big dry creek, where I caught the lime narrow - gauge train.

    Chapter 8

  • The goring of the horses is the more brutal part of the affair.

    The Spanish Nations and Their Increasing Interest To Us

  • The Americans are very fond of fast trotting horses; I do not refer to rackers, as they term horses that trot before and gallop behind, but fair trotters, and they certainly have a description of horse that we could not easily match in England.

    Diary in America, Series Two

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