Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The Eucharist.
  • transitive v. To administer the Eucharist to.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. the Eucharist
  • v. To administer the Eucharist to.
  • v. To prepare for a journey.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The eucharist.
  • transitive v. To administer the eucharist to.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To administer the eucharist to.
  • Hence To prepare for a journey.
  • n. The eucharist; the sacrament.
  • n. The act of taking or receiving the sacrament.

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English hūsel, sacrifice, Eucharist.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English housel, from Old English hūsl ("housel, Eucharist, the Host, a sacrifice"), from Proto-Germanic *hunslan (“sacrifice”), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱwen- (“holy”). Cognate with Icelandic húsl ("housel"), Gothic  (hunsl, "sacrifice, offering"), Slavic *svętъ (“holy, sacred”) (OED). (Wiktionary)
From Middle English houselen, from Old English hūslian ("to administer the sacrament"), from Proto-Germanic *hunslōnan (“to sacrifice, offer”), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱwen- (“holy”). Cognate with Icelandic húsla ("to housel"), Old Swedish húsla ("to administer the Eucharist to"), Gothic  (hunsljan, "to offer, sacrifice"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The word "housel" for the sacrament of the Lord's Supper has gone out of use, though most of us are familiar with the line

    Bell's Cathedrals: Wimbourne Minster and Christchurch Priory A Short History of Their Foundation and a Description of Their Buildings

  • Begone from the housel stand not at the court-yard gate, annoying my masters! otherwise shalt thou die, for thou art a Hellene born. and with them have we no dealings.

    Helen

  • For they shrive them and housel them evermore once or twice in the week.

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And there be many of them that housel them every day; and so do we not on this half, albeit that Saint Paul commandeth it, saying, OMNIBUS

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And in a ladychapel another taking housel all to his own cheek.

    Ulysses

  • Lewis was staring towards the housel Jessica opened the french window and ran up to him, hugging him with a love that made Lacey's eyes sting with tears.

    A Cure For Love

  • "Kelolo will not live in this house any morel He will live in that housel" And she indicated one of the compound quarters about twenty feet removed from his previous residence.

    Hawaii

  • "Acoluthus he is called, who bears the candle or taper in God's ministries when the Gospel is read, or when the housel is hallowed at the altar: not to dispel, as it were, the dim darkness, but, with that light, to announce bliss, in honour of Christ who is our light."

    Notes and Queries, Number 63, January 11, 1851

  • "My dear Everard," she whispered, "Henry is in the housel Besides"Yes, I suppose you must be Everard.

    The Great Impersonation

  • Low-latched in leaf-light housel his too huge godhead.

    The Bugler's First Communion

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