incapacitations love

incapacitations

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of incapacitation.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And doubtless we as a society fear the incapacitations associated with growing old.

    Mary Walker Baron: Declining With Dignity

  • Average age for incapacitations was 47 years old (range 25 to 59 years).

    Imagining a Day When Airliners Are Flown Solo

  • "The most important factor that appears to be responsible for the exceptionally good U.S. airline safety record associated with in-flight medical incapacitations," the study said, "is the presence of a second pilot."

    Imagining a Day When Airliners Are Flown Solo

  • A 2004 study of U.S. airline pilots by the Federal Aviation Administration found 39 incapacitations and 11 impairments aboard 47 aircraft during the six-year period studied.

    Imagining a Day When Airliners Are Flown Solo

  • And besides death, Nixon's resignation from office, medical incapacitations, you had Clinton's impeachment and the significant possibility that the VP would take over if the dynamics and polls had shifted against Clinton.

    "Will Sarah Palin help McCain's campaign?"

  • Where are the fervent protests against sending their husbands and children to unnecessary deaths or incapacitations?

    Dissident Voice

  • There also were four incidents of alcohol incapacitations, said Capt.

    The Appleton Post-Crescent Latest Headlines

  • Some of the members finally waking up from their inconvenient death/incapacitations.

    AnimeBlogger.net Antenna

  • If you don't see him / her boogie, shake, shred or convulse into dance moves at least once throughout the music's duration - barring any physical incapacitations - you've got your answer: They're walking dead.

    JamBase

  • Given that God had endowed the human mind with freedom, said Thomas Jefferson, "all attempts to influence it by temporal punishments, or burthens, or by civil incapacitations, tend only to beget habits of hypocrisy and meanness."

    The Economist: Correspondent's diary

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