Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Not accompanied with excitement.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Not accompanied with excitement.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Not irritative; not producing or attended with irritation or excitement.

Etymologies

in- +‎ irritative (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • This happens to the capillaries, when the heart and arteries are affected as above by the torpor of the stomach, when it is occasioned by previous great expenditure of its sensorial power, and thus constitutes fever with weak pulse, which is here termed inirritative fever, typhus mitior.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • _ Paralysis of the bladder is frequently a symptom in inirritative fever; in this case the patient makes no water for

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • And because in inirritative fevers, or those with arterial debility, the capillaries acquire increased strength, as is evinced by the heat of the skin, while the pulsations of the heart and arteries remain feeble.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • This fever from absorption of putrid matter is of the inirritative or typhus kind.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • The mucus of the rectum sometimes comes away like pellucid hartshorn jelly, and liquefies by heat like that, towards the end of inirritative fevers, which is owing to the thinner part of the mucus not being absorbed, and thus resembles the catarrh of some old people.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • In the first class of diseases two kinds of fevers were described, one from excess, and the other from defect of irritation; and were in consequence termed irritative, and inirritative fevers.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • This disease differs from the inirritative fever by the pulse not being more frequent than in health.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • And finally, as this weak action of the heart and arteries is not induced by exhaustion of sensorial power, but by defect of the excitement of association, the accumulation of this power of association increases the action of the capillaries, and thus induces inirritative fever.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • _ Sensitive fever, when unmixed with either irritative or inirritative fever, may be distinguished from either of them by the less comparative diminution of muscular strength; or in other words, from its being attended with less diminution of the sensorial power of irritation.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • Many symptoms, which attend inirritative fevers, accompany this disease, as cold hands and feet at periodic times, scurf on the tongue, want of appetite, muddy urine, with pains of the head, and sometimes vertigo, and vomiting.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

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