Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. irregularity; disorder
  • v. To sort or arrange incorrectly.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Irregularity; disorder.
  • transitive v. To order ill; to manage erroneously; to conduct badly.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To order or manage amiss; put out of order; derange.
  • To misconduct; misbehave: used chiefly reflexively.
  • n. Disorder; want of method; irregularity.

Etymologies

mis- +‎ order (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • I wasn’t slamming McDonald’s, but for anyone who’s been in one, a misorder is promptly thrown in the garbage, which is the same place your jackass comment #213 belongs.

    Think Progress » Rove Returns: CIA Leaker Now Leading Campaign to Blame Local Officials for Katrina Aftermath

  • Both sexes dressed in gaudy colors and delighted in strange fashions, so that, {497} is Roger Ascham said, "he thought himself most brave that was most monstrous in misorder."

    The Age of the Reformation

  • And for all the great commaunde-mentes, that came out of the Courte, yet this bold misorder, was winked at, and borne withall, in the Courte.

    The Scholemaster

  • Parlament, many good Proclamations, diuerse strait commanude-mentes, sore punishment openlie, speciall regarde priuatelie, cold not do so moch to take away one misorder, as the example of one big one of this Courte did, still to kepe vp the same: The memorie whereof, doth yet remaine, in a common prouerbe of

    The Scholemaster

  • Yea, there be as fayre houses of Religion, as great prouision, as diligent officers, to kepe vp this misorder, as Bridewell is, and all the Masters there, to kepe downe misorder.

    The Scholemaster

  • O prodigious licentiousness, and hellish misorder, worthy to be drowned in the lake of Lethe!

    The Works of Mr. George Gillespie (Vol. 1 of 2)

  • And for all the great commaunde - mentes, that came out of the Courte, yet this bold misorder, was winked at, and borne withall, in the Courte.

    The Scholemaster

  • Parlament, many good Proclamations, diuerse strait commanude - mentes, sore punishment openlie, speciall regarde priuatelie, cold not do so moch to take away one misorder, as the example of one big one of this Courte did, still to kepe vp the same: The memorie whereof, doth yet remaine, in a common prouerbe of

    The Scholemaster

  • If they misorder something, it's my problem, because I should look at their orders.

    Cut On The Dotted Line

  • And yet further desiring, and also most earnestly requiring you, as you tender the state of our company, that you will haue a speciall regard vnto the order of our houses and our seruants as well at Colmogro and Vologda, as at Mosco and to see and consider if any misorder be amongst our seruants or apprentises wherby you thinke we might hereafter be put to hinderance or losse of any part of our goods or priuilege there, that you doe not onely see the same reformed, but also to certifie vs thereof by your letter at large, as our trust is in you.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

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