Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. any microscopic particle less than about 100 nanometers (nm) in diameter. In aerosol science, the term is often reserved for particles less than 50 nm in diameter; the term "ultrafine particles" is used for particles less than 100 nm in diameter.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Researchers at International Business Machines Corp. said they developed a tiny drug, called a nanoparticle, that in test-tube experiments showed promise as a weapon against dangerous superbugs that have become resistant to antibiotics.

    Big Blue's Tiny Bug Zapper

  • Researchers at IBM said they developed a tiny drug, called a nanoparticle, that in test-tube experiments showed promise as a weapon against dangerous superbugs that have become resistant to antibiotics.

    WHO Calls for Action on Superbugs

  • The new transistor, called the nanoparticle organic memory field-effect transistor, or NOMFET for short, does it with just one.

    Livescience.com

  • "Our nanoparticle is a foreign body just like a viral vector is, but it has a self-destructive mechanism so it does not generate a strong response from the immune system," said Chenguang Zhou, a lead author of the study.

    Gizmag Emerging Technology Magazine

  • The resulting device is called a nanoparticle organic memory field-effect transistor or "NOMFET".

    Science Fiction in the News

  • Scientists at Leicester University hope to develop a new kind of nanoparticle that could improve cancer treatment and MRI scans.

    The Engineer - News

  • While this recognition with respect to hazard is contentious, there is no hesitation to provide intellectual property rights via patents to each new kind of nanoparticle to identify it as "new."

    MRZine.org

  • But the use of the term "nanoparticle" here is so vague as to be a smear once it reaches a pop - science level blog like this.

    Boing Boing

  • A paper published by University of Rochester Medical Center researchers now confirms that at least one kind of nanoparticle can penetrate a human's most resistant line of defense against foreign particles: the skin.

    DailyTech Main News Feed

  • The further development of CPMV for in vivo applications such as nanoparticle-based imaging sensors, therapeutics, and vaccines depends on the ability to effectively standardize the properties of CPMV preparations.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.