Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A new word, expression, or usage.
  • n. The creation or use of new words or senses.
  • n. Psychology The invention of new words regarded as a symptom of certain psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia.
  • n. Psychology A word so invented.
  • n. Theology A new doctrine or a new interpretation of scripture.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A word or phrase which has recently been coined; a new word or phrase.
  • n. (uncountable) The act or instance of coining, or uttering a new word.
  • n. The newly coined, meaningless words or phrases of someone with a psychosis, usually schizophrenia.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The introduction of new words, or the use of old words in a new sense.
  • n. A new word, phrase, or expression.
  • n. A new doctrine; specifically, rationalism.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A new word or phrase, or a new use of a word.
  • n. The use of new words, or of old words in new senses.
  • n. A new doctrine.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a newly invented word or phrase
  • n. the act of inventing a word or phrase

Etymologies

From French néologisme, from Ancient Greek νέος ("new") + λόγος (logos, "word"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • Thanks to Erin McKean for her help with the definition for my neologism "Impert." A person who makes valuable contributions in a field of knowledge despite lacking formal training or professional connections in that field. The impert's contributions typically diverge from conventional styles, thinking, or theories of experts.

    December 11, 2012

  • There are tons of neologisms on this site.

    April 15, 2007

  • and my favorite new word: wordie!

    December 9, 2006