Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Nonexistence; nothingness.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Nothingness; a state of being nothing.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state of being nothing, or of no account or importance; nothingness.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the state of nonexistence

Etymologies

French nihilité, from Old French, from Medieval Latin nihilitās, from Latin nihil, nothing; see nihilism.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin nihil ("nothing") + -ity. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • All the conflict of faith and doubt, the distress roused by the idea of nihility, the anger he had felt at the unjust sufferings of mankind, had been swept away by her fresh cool hands.

    The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete Lourdes, Rome and Paris

  • Maybe it scares the hell out of you, but perhaps you yearn for it too … the nihility, the nothingness because it's your essence, your embodiment.

    The Door

  • Embrace the solace that accompanies the wave of dark nihility.

    The Door

  • Maybe it scares the hell out of you, but perhaps you yearn for it too ... the nihility, the nothingness because it's your essence, your embodiment.

    The Door

  • Has any one been ever able to answer his question: Speed an arrow from the limits of the world — will it fall into nothing, into nihility?

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • So that this much touted Caribbean Diaspora conference and meeting with President Bush may very well be an exercise in nihility given the fact that an incoming president – Democrat or Republican – is not bound by any law or principle to respect the positions set out in the communiqué.

    The Caribbean Dances With George Bush

  • His profoundest desire, he said, was todie, to know, at last, “complete unconciousness, total nihility, a final end to dreaming, the last and only salvation.”

    FORGE OF EMPIRES 1861-1871

  • Nishitani thus explained the personal encounter with nihilism as an experience of the extreme relative nothingness of “nihility” or “vacuous nothingness” (kyomu), and for him the central task of

    The Kyoto School

  • Yet the real breakthrough to a non-dualistic reaffirmation of the self and the world only occurs when the relative nothingness of nihility is in turn broken through to a genuine experience of Absolute Nothingness or true Emptiness on the “field of śûnyatâ.”

    The Kyoto School

  • Visions of swirling galaxies filled his head, among which he and his friends and the Commonwealth entire were so insignificant as to constitute little but nihility.

    Flinx's Folly

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