Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as misère. See also Cayenne whist.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • To spell out the relation of their terms and hence the validity of the first figure syllogisms, he reformulates the traditional dici de omni et nullo rules (see King 1985: 71):

    The Statue of a Writer

  • Abelard's rules 1 and 2 are equivalent to the rules of class inclusion that later became the subject of much discussion, i.e., the so-called dici de omni et nullo rules.

    The Statue of a Writer

  • All first figure moods are proved by the rules of class inclusion, that is, the dici de omni and dici de nullo rules.

    The Statue of a Writer

  • In his discussion of the syllogism Valla does not refer to an important principle employed by Aristotle and his commentators: dici de omni et nullo (to be said/predicated about all and about none).

    Lorenzo Valla

  • One can describe this fact by saying that when the universal quantifier combines with a predicate to form a subject, that predicate is governed by dictum de nullo; but when a universally quantified subject combines with another predicate to form a proposition, this “second” predicate is governed by dictum de omni.

    Logical Form

  • This illustrates dictum de nullo: in the scope of negation, replacing ˜dog™ with the more restrictive predicate ˜brown dog™ yields a valid inference.

    Logical Form

  • By itself, this is expected, since ˜old patient™ is more restrictive than ˜patient™; and as we saw above, a universally quantified subject is governed by dictum de nullo.

    Logical Form

  • And medieval logicians made great strides in reducing syllogistic logic to two principles: dictum de omni and dictum de nullo.

    Logical Form

  • Likewise, in accordance with dictum de nullo: if no animal is clever, and every dog is an animal, it follows that no dog is clever.

    Logical Form

  • Linguists have also discovered grammatical correlates of dictum de nullo environments.

    Logical Form

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