Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or relating to a parson; clerical.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to a parson; clerical.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of or pertaining to a parson or his office; characteristic of parsons; suited to or in keeping with the position or duties of a parson; clerical: as, parsonic pretensions.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Maintaining a very quiet manner towards this arrogant little maid, and subsequently observing the same towards the parsonic-looking, black-coated, white-neckclothed waiter, I got civility from them ere long.

    Villette

  • Mr. R.H. H.GNETT nobly restrained himself from making a too parsonic parson, yet kept enough of the distinctive flavour to excite a passionate anti-clerical behind me into clamorously derisive laughter; a very good piece of work.

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 159, August 18th, 1920

  • On one side was an effigy of a parsonic kind of man, crucified head downwards upon a cross.

    The Mark of the Beast

  • I began about Adam and Eve, with an eye to future parsonic probings.

    Elizabeth and Her German Garden

  • Dissenters try to be gentlemen; but George has no misgivings about himself on that score; so he gives his undivided energy to his efforts to be parsonic.

    The Irrational Knot Being the Second Novel of His Nonage

  • Parson Endicott suffered from shortness of sight and a high parsonic manner.

    Shining Ferry

  • Add something of the parsonic (he was ordained deacon before leaving Oxford, but did not proceed to priest's orders till near the end of his time at Clifton); add a simple natural piety which purged the parsonic of all "churchiness."

    From a Cornish Window A New Edition

  • Langham, whether he liked it or not, had to face the parsonic breakfast and the parsonic day.

    Robert Elsmere

  • The little accidents of a personal experience had led to wide generalizations, as is the way with us mortals, and the position of the young parson in these days of increased parsonic pretensions was, to Mrs. Elsmere, a position in which there was an inherent risk of absurdity.

    Robert Elsmere

  • The little accidents of a personal experience had led to wide generalisations, as is the way with us mortals, and the position of the young parson in these days of increased parsonic pretensions was, to Mrs. Elsmere, a position in which there was an inherent risk of absurdity.

    Robert Elsmere

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