Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Point of honor.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • [FN#305] These pretentious and curious displays of coquetry are not uncommon in handsome slave-girls when newly bought; and it is a kind of pundonor to humour them.

    Arabian nights. English

  • It renders the Spaniard at times pompous and grandiloquent; prone to carry the "pundonor," or point of honor, beyond the bounds of sober sense and sound morality; disposed, in the midst of poverty, to affect the "grande caballero," and to look down with sovereign disdain upon

    Wolfert's Roost and Miscellanies

  • 305 These pretentious and curious displays of coquetry are not uncommon in handsome slave-girls when newly bought; and it is a kind of pundonor to humour them.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • "pundonor" which is supposed to characterise Arab thieves.

    Arabian nights. English

  • "pundonor," the high punctilio, and rarely drew the stiletto in their disputes, but their pride was silent and contumelious.

    Chronicle of the Conquest of Granada

  • The Badawi who eructates as a civility, has a mortal hatred to a crepitus ventris; and were a by-stander to laugh at its accidental occurrence, he would at once be cut down as a “pundonor.”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • The excuse which the Caliph would find for him is the pundonor shown in killing one he loved so fondly.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Burckhardt, who suffered from them, gives a long account of their treachery and utter absence of that Arab “pundonor” which is supposed to characterise Arab thieves.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Trading tribes rarely affect the pundonor which characterizes the pastoral and the predatory; these people traffic in all things, even in the chastity of their women.

    Two Trips to Gorilla Land and the Cataracts of the Congo

  • Three motives animate them all: loyalty to the king, devotion to the cross, and the _pundonor_: that sensitive personal honour -- the "Castilian pride" of "Hernani," -- which sometimes ran into fantastic excess.

    A History of English Romanticism in the Nineteenth Century

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