Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A deduction from an amount to be paid or a return of part of an amount given in payment.
  • transitive v. To deduct or return (an amount) from a payment or bill.
  • transitive v. To lessen; diminish.
  • n. Variant of rabbet.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A deduction from an amount to be paid; an abatement
  • n. The return of part of an amount already paid
  • n. A rectangular groove made to hold two pieces (of wood etc) together; a rabbet
  • v. To deduct or return an amount from a bill or payment
  • v. To diminish or lessen something
  • v. To cut a rebate (or rabbet) in something

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Diminution.
  • n. Deduction; abatement
  • n. A portion of a sum paid, returned to the purchaser, as a method of discounting. The rebate is sometimes returned by the manufacturer, after the full price is paid to the retailer by the purchaser.
  • n. A rectangular longitudinal recess or groove, cut in the corner or edge of any body; a rabbet. See rabbet.
  • n. A piece of wood hafted into a long stick, and serving to beat out mortar.
  • n. An iron tool sharpened something like a chisel, and used for dressing and polishing wood.
  • n. A kind of hard freestone used in making pavements.
  • intransitive v. To abate; to withdraw.
  • transitive v. To beat to obtuseness; to deprive of keenness; to blunt; to turn back the point of, as a lance used for exercise.
  • transitive v. To deduct from; to make a discount from, as interest due, or customs duties.
  • transitive v. To return a portion of a sum paid, as a method of discounting of prices.
  • transitive v. To cut a rebate in. See rabbet, v.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To beat back; drive back by beating; fend or ward off; repulse.
  • To beat down; beat to bluntness; make obtuse or dull, literally or figuratively; blunt; bate.
  • To set or throw off; allow as a discount or abatement; make a drawback of. See the noun.
  • To draw back or away; withdraw; recede.
  • To make a rebate or rabbet in, as a piece of joinery or other work; rabbet.
  • n. Diminution; retrenchment; specifically, an allowance by way of discount or drawback; a deduction from a gross amount.
  • n. A longitudinal space or groove cut back or sunk in a piece of joinery, timber, or the like, to receive the edge of some other part.
  • n. A kind of hard freestone used in pavements.
  • n. A piece of wood fastened to a handle, used for beating mortar.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. cut a rebate in (timber or stone)
  • n. a refund of some fraction of the amount paid
  • n. a rectangular groove made to hold two pieces together
  • v. give a reduction in the price during a sale
  • v. join with a rebate

Etymologies

From Middle English rebaten, to deduct, from Old French rabattre, rebattre, to reduce, to beat down again : re-, re- + abbattre, to beat down; see abate.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French rabatre < batre. See also abate. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • to bate again...

    August 10, 2009

  • I must be properly enabled from that quarter, to pacify her, or, at least, to rebate her first violence.

    Lovelace to Belford, Clarissa by Samuel Richardson

    December 19, 2007

  • Also to lessen, diminish.

    December 19, 2007