Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Music A repetition of a phrase or verse.
  • n. Music A return to an original theme.
  • n. A recurrence or resumption of an action.
  • transitive v. To repeat or resume an action; make a reprise of.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A recurrence or resumption of an action.
  • n. A repetition of a phrase, or a return to an earlier theme.
  • n. A renewal of a failed attack, after going back into the on guard position.
  • v. To take (something) up or on again.
  • v. To repeat or resume an action
  • v. To recompense; to pay.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A taking by way of retaliation.
  • n. Deductions and duties paid yearly out of a manor and lands, as rent charge, rent seck, pensions, annuities, and the like.
  • n. A ship recaptured from an enemy or from a pirate.
  • transitive v. To take again; to retake.
  • transitive v. To recompense; to pay.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To take again; retake.
  • To recompense; pay.
  • To take; arrest.
  • n. A taking by way of retaliation; reprisal.
  • n. In masonry, the return of a molding in an internal angle.
  • n. In maritime law, a ship recaptured from an enemy or a pirate. If recaptured within twenty-four hours of her capture, she must be restored to her owners; if after that period, she is the lawful prize of those who have recaptured her.
  • n. plural In law, yearly deductions, duties, or payments out of a manor and lands, as rent-charge, rent-seek, annuities, and the like. Also written reprizes.
  • n. In music: The act of repeating a passage, or a passage repeated.
  • n. A return to the first theme or subject of a short work or section, after an intermediate or contrasted passage.
  • n. A revival of an obsolete or forgotten work.
  • n. Blame; reproach.
  • n.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. repeat an earlier theme of a composition

Etymologies

Middle English, act of taking back, from Old French, from feminine past participle of reprendre, to take back; see reprieve.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

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