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Etymologies

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Examples

  • And as I counted them now, as a child will to while away tedium, they were all there, forty of them, all canvas-topped, big and massive, crudely fashioned, pitching and lurching, grinding and jarring over sand and sage-brush and rock.

    Chapter 12

  • I had just come up with an armful of sage-brush, and I stopped to listen and to stare at the intruder, whom I hated, because it was in the air to hate, because I knew that every last person in our company hated these strangers who were white-skinned like us and because of whom we had been compelled to make our camp in a circle.

    Chapter 12

  • While some of the men chopped sage-brush and we children carried it to the fires that were kindling, other men unyoked the oxen and let them stampede for water.

    Chapter 12

  • Our city lies in the midst of a desert of the purest—most unadulterated, and uncompromising sand—in which infernal soil nothing than that fag-end of vegetable creation, ‘sage-brush,’ ventures to grow.

    LIGHTING OUT FOR THE TERRITORY

  • Materializing at the campfire, he looked to an astonished Henry Adams like “a bird of paradise rising in the sage-brush.”

    The Five of Hearts

  • Adams, who spent a summer with the survey, saw him as “a bird of paradise rising in the sage-brush.”

    The Five of Hearts

  • We wrestled briefly over the controls, and the big rig slewed off the blacktop, jacknifed through a roadside diner, double-rolled into the sage-brush.

    I Met John Scalvi! « Whatever

  • The moisture of the plowed land, the heaviness of labour and growth and grain-bearing, utterly destroyed it; one could breathe that only on the bright edges of the world, on the great grass plains or the sage-brush desert.

    Annette's Notebook

  • Perhaps the dialogue is all the more swallowed by a vast Western expanse, in which human utterances amount to mere tufts of sage-brush.

    Missing the Mark

  • One hears about “sage-brush districting”—legislatures that carved up judicial districts in such a way as to exile an unpopular judge to the barren wastelands.

    A History of American Law

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