Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative form of Sazerac.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a cocktail made with bourbon with bitters and Pernod and sugar served with lemon peel

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I'm pretty sure an "Anti-Schools and Jobs Act of 2008" would pass in LA somehow, unless it had a sazerac bill tacked on.

    Your Right Hand Thief

  • We started out with some seasonal cocktails: I had the salt & pepper highball, which was strangely bitter and full of pepper and Zach had a sazerac, which he loved.

    January « 2005 « I HEART BACON

  • Credit aside, Mr. Sweete suspects it evolved from the sazerac cocktail not to be confused with the rye brand, made with rye, sugar syrup, absinthe and bitters.

    The Globe and Mail - Home RSS feed

  • Bronko is long gone but not so the inspiration of Michaels' Manhattan/sazerac hybrid, The Future Ghost of

    StarTribune.com rss feed

  • The distillery runs an on-site bar, where bartenders mix beautiful cocktails $6-$7 like a sazerac made from the company's sorghum whiskey and dole out tastes of unsweetened rum, ouzo and dry honey liqueur.

    NYT > Home Page

  • "Some drinks look the same from every angle, like a sazerac," Mr. Feldman said.

    NYT > Home Page

  • Likewise, the sazerac, attributed to be America's very first cocktail, is a combination of cognac, rye whiskey, absinthe and bitters.

    OnMilwaukee.com

  • Overshadowed by the popularly served Hurricane, the sazerac fell out of the drinker's limelight when absinthe was banned in the early 1900s.

    OnMilwaukee.com

  • Well, absinthe is back on bar shelves, bringing the sazerac back to life with it.

    OnMilwaukee.com

  • Bartenders Tiffany Short and Jon Harris, when not studying old tomes about spirits, create a slate of pre-Prohibition cocktails, such as the sazerac (theirs is rye whisky and bitters made in a glass rinsed with absinthe) and the camelback, brandy paired with pine-cone liqueur.

    The Globe and Mail - Home RSS feed

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