Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The place where a structure or group of structures was, is, or is to be located: a good site for the school.
  • n. The place or setting of something: a historic site; a job site.
  • n. A website.
  • transitive v. To situate or locate on a site: sited the power plant by the river.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Sorrow, grief.
  • n. The place where anything is fixed; situation; local position; as, the site of a city or of a house.
  • n. A place fitted or chosen for any certain permanent use or occupation; as, a site for a church.
  • n. The posture or position of a thing.
  • n. A computer installation, particularly one associated with an intranet or internet service or telecommunications.
  • n. A website.
  • v. To situate or place a building.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The place where anything is fixed; situation; local position.
  • n. A place fitted or chosen for any certain permanent use or occupation.
  • n. The posture or position of a thing.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To grieve; mourn.
  • To select a site for; place; locate.
  • n. Sorrow; grief; misery; trouble.
  • n. Sinfulness; sin.
  • n. Position, especially with reference to environment; situation; location.
  • n. The ground on which anything is, has been, or is to be located.
  • n. Posture; attitude; pose.
  • n. In fortification, the ground occupied by a work: also called plane of site.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the piece of land on which something is located (or is to be located)
  • n. a computer connected to the internet that maintains a series of web pages on the World Wide Web
  • n. physical position in relation to the surroundings
  • v. assign a location to

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French, from Latin situs; see situs.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Probably from Old Norse (compare Norwegian syt). (Wiktionary)
From Middle English, from Anglo-Norman site, from Latin situs ("position, place, site"), from sinere ("to put, lay, set down, usually let, suffer, permit"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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