Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A form of trapshooting in which clay targets are thrown from traps to simulate birds in flight and are shot at from different stations.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A form of trapshooting using clay targets to simulate birds in flight.
  • n. A hand consisting of a 9, a 5, a 2, and two other cards lower than 9.
  • n. The ejaculation of sperm.
  • n. A scoop with a long handle, used to wash the sides of a vessel and formerly to wet the sails or deck.
  • n. A loud, disruptive and poorly educated person.
  • v. To shoot or spray (used of fluids).
  • v. To ejaculate.
  • n. news or gossip
  • v. to look through the front windows of somebody else's house

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A scoop with a long handle, used to wash the sides of a vessel, and formerly to wet the sails or deck.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Swift; fleet.
  • Keen; bold; brave.
  • Swiftly; quickly.
  • A dialectal form of scoot.
  • n. The pollack.
  • n. A scoop.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the sport of shooting at clay pigeons that are hurled upward in such a way as to simulate the flight of a bird

Etymologies

Alteration of shoot.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Altered form of shoot. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • "... a sort of long scoop used to wet the decks and sides of a ship, in order to keep them cool, and to prevent them from splitting by the heat of the sun.... It is also employed in small vessels to wet the sails, to render them more efficacious in light breezes: this operation is sometimes performed in large ships by means of the fire-engine."
    Falconer's New Universal Dictionary of the Marine (1816), 483–484

    October 13, 2008