Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A rope, chain, or similar restraint for holding an animal in place, allowing a short radius in which it can move about.
  • n. A similar ropelike restraint used as a safety measure, especially for young children and astronauts.
  • n. A rope, chain, or similar restraint for holding one, especially an animal, in place, allowing a short radius in which one can move about.
  • n. The extent or limit of one's resources, abilities, or endurance: drought-stricken farmers at the end of their tether.
  • transitive v. To fasten or restrict with or as if with a tether.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a rope, cable etc. that holds something in place whilst allowing some movement
  • n. the limit of one's abilities, resources etc
  • n. The cardinal number three in an old counting system used in Teesdale and Swaledale. (Variant of tethera)
  • v. to restrict something with a tether

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A long rope or chain by which an animal is fastened, as to a stake, so that it can range or feed only within certain limits.
  • transitive v. To confine, as an animal, with a long rope or chain, as for feeding within certain limits.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To confine, as a grazing animal, with a rope or chain within certain limits; hence, to tie (anything) with or as with a rope or halter.
  • n. A rope, chain, or halter, especially one by which a grazing animal is confined within certain limits: often used figuratively, in the sense of a course in which one may move until checked; scope allowed.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. restraint consisting of a rope (or light chain) used to restrain an animal
  • v. tie with a tether

Etymologies

Middle English tedir, tethir, from Old Norse tjōdhr.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old Norse tjóðr ( > Danish tøjr). Cognate with North German Tüder ("tether for binding the cattle"). (Wiktionary)

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