Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A shop or establishment where tinware is made and repaired.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We find that as every year we put into a Southern community colored men who can start a brick-yard, a sawmill, a tin-shop, or a printing-office, — men who produce something that makes the white man partly dependent upon the negro, instead of all the dependence being on the other side, — a change takes place in the relations of the races.

    Civil Rights & Black Identity

  • But the rattle and banging of the automobile, like nothing so much as a tin-shop with a full crew working at high speed, urged the horses on and on.

    The Mission of Janice Day

  • Here there was an addition to a tin-shop underneath, and he dropped down and found himself within twelve feet of a narrow alleyway.

    The Young Oarsmen of Lakeview

  • The question was asked by a youth in the tin-shop.

    The Young Oarsmen of Lakeview

  • I turned to the trainer before I went to my room over the tin-shop.

    Tramping on Life

  • "Old Hen" worked in a tin-shop, read Ruskin, regarded Debs as a prophet, received many papers devoted to socialism and the New Thought, and believed that he believed in no man, no God and no devil.

    In Our Town

  • We find that as every year we put into a Southern community colored men who can start a brick-yard, a sawmill, a tin-shop, or a printing-office, -- men who produce something that makes the white man partly dependent upon the negro, instead of all the dependence being on the other side, -- a change takes place in the relations of the races.

    The Awakening of the Negro

  • About their necks, arms, and ankles, they wore strings of cheap ornaments, pewter medals, and coarse glass beads, with the addition of a few scraps of tin, the refuse of some tin-shop passed on their way.

    Rural Hours

  • Prattville was a small manufacturing town, and Lanier was about as appropriately placed there as Arion would have been in a tin-shop, but he kept his humorous outlook on life, departing from his serenity so far as to make his only attempts at expressing in verse his political indignation, the results of which he did not regard as poetry, and they do not appear in the collection of his poems.

    Literary Hearthstones of Dixie

  • Carrie and the peddler had up an awful case -- they was going to get married, and open up a tin-shop at Carlton, but a man come along and said the peddler already had a wife or two to his credit, and the skunk changed his route.

    Dixie Hart

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