to table a question love

to table a question

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  • That's the wrongest thing I've heard all day!

    August 11, 2010

  • Scroll down, humpers.

    August 11, 2010

  • To "table a question" means to end debate on it (e.g., to end all discussion).

    August 11, 2010

  • Well, I should have clarified: they're for very little kids. The ones who would cry to find their juice boxes are empty because they didn't realize not to squeeze them. Once you are old enough to realize what you're doing, why... then it's fun.

    May 7, 2010

  • Well, yes, better not. Old fruit boxers end up punch drunk.

    May 7, 2010

  • Those covers just take all the fun out of the fruit box experience.

    May 7, 2010

  • There's a squeeze-resistant cover?! That changes the whole juice-box equation.

    May 6, 2010

  • Mmm. And, they'll fit in those little covers that prevent kids from squeezing juice boxes and spilling "Lit'l Smokies" all over the place.

    May 6, 2010

  • To save time cb you should try new "Strained Lit'l Smokies" - they are packaged like a juice box, each with its own straw.

    May 6, 2010

  • No, no. I just chew very thoroughly.

    May 6, 2010

  • It must be some sort of competitive eating.

    May 5, 2010

  • CB, according to the timestamps, you have been gnoshing on Lit'l Smokies for almost two hours. How many packages do you have? Don't forget to drink some water too.

    May 5, 2010

  • Mmfn. *chewing*

    May 5, 2010

  • According to http://www.parlipro.org/table.htm, one could interpret it both ways. To place a question on the table means to introduce it for debate, but not necessarily immediately. However when it is on the table it must be debated at some point during the session.

    May 5, 2010

  • Umbrage, etc. I was trying to say that "putting something on the table" is NOT the same thing as "tabling" it. The first implies immediate discussion; the second, delayed until a later time. Sorry I wasn't more clear. I was eating Cheddar Lit'l Smokies and typing with my mouth full.

    May 5, 2010

  • ...Or temporarily pulling the chair (Chairperson's immediate support) out from underneath it.

    May 5, 2010

  • Bilby and cb are right. To table a question is to put it out there (on the table) and invite discussion. Used in parliament and in other formal meetings.

    May 5, 2010

  • Putting something on the table always meant, to me, to bring it forward for discussion or examination. Tabling a question is a parliamentary/congressional thing to do, and it means putting it on a table for later discussion. If it helps, think of it as a side table.

    Perhaps we should change the idiom to "nightstanding the question."

    It would make congressional debates more titillating, anyhow.

    May 4, 2010

  • I suggest we table this question. That way, those who interpret it to mean putting it aside can refrain from further comment for now, while those who see it the other way can continue the debate.

    May 4, 2010

  • I think the autoantonym comes more strongly in the idiomatic expression"put something on the table" -- that phrase can equally mean present new information or laying old information aside.

    May 1, 2010

  • I agree with oroboros and thtownse - to table something is to agree to postpone dealing with it.

    May 1, 2010

  • Never heard it. I've heard of tabling documents, reports, etc. that is putting them before a parliament, commission or some such, but tabling questions ... ?

    May 1, 2010

  • I'm with thtownse. "Let's table it" is to "put it on the back burner". Table is an autoantonym: table an offer (present it) v. table, withdraw.

    Cf., beg the question.

    May 1, 2010

  • I had thought this meant to "put the question aside for now"? Not really sure though.

    April 30, 2010

  • to just say what you want to say

    April 30, 2010