Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A perennial woody plant having a main trunk and usually a distinct crown.
  • n. A plant or shrub resembling a tree in form or size.
  • n. Something, such as a clothes tree, that resembles a tree in form.
  • n. A wooden beam, post, stake, or bar used as part of a framework or structure.
  • n. A saddletree.
  • n. A diagram that has branches in descending lines showing relationships as of hierarchy or lineage: a family tree; a telephone tree.
  • n. Computer Science A structure for organizing or classifying data in which every item can be traced to a single origin through a unique path.
  • n. Archaic A gallows.
  • n. Archaic The cross on which Jesus was crucified.
  • transitive v. To force up a tree: Dogs treed the raccoon.
  • transitive v. Informal To force into a difficult position; corner.
  • transitive v. To supply with trees: treed the field with oaks.
  • transitive v. To stretch (a shoe or boot) onto a shoetree.
  • idiom up a tree Informal In a situation of great difficulty or perplexity; helpless.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A large plant, not exactly defined, but typically over four meters in height, a single trunk which grows in girth with age and branches (which also grow in circumference with age).
  • n. Any plant that is reminiscent of the above but not classified as a tree in the strict botanical sense: for example the banana "tree".
  • n. An object made from a tree trunk and having multiple hooks or storage platforms.
  • n. A device used to hold or stretch a shoe open.
  • n. The structural frame of a saddle.
  • n. A connected graph with no cycles or, equivalently, a connected graph with n vertices and n-1 edges.
  • n. A recursive data structure in which each node has zero or more nodes as children.
  • n. A display or listing of entries or elements such that there are primary and secondary entries shown, usually linked by drawn lines or by indenting to the right.
  • n. Any structure or construct having branches akin to (1).
  • n. The structure or wooden frame used in the construction of a saddle used in horse riding.
  • n. Marijuana.
  • v. To chase (an animal or person) up a tree.
  • v. To place upon a tree; to fit with a tree; to stretch upon a tree.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Any perennial woody plant of considerable size (usually over twenty feet high) and growing with a single trunk.
  • n. Something constructed in the form of, or considered as resembling, a tree, consisting of a stem, or stock, and branches.
  • n. A piece of timber, or something commonly made of timber; -- used in composition, as in axletree, boottree, chesstree, crosstree, whiffletree, and the like.
  • n. A cross or gallows; as Tyburn tree.
  • n. Wood; timber.
  • n. A mass of crystals, aggregated in arborescent forms, obtained by precipitation of a metal from solution. See Lead tree, under Lead.
  • transitive v. To drive to a tree; to cause to ascend a tree.
  • transitive v. To place upon a tree; to fit with a tree; to stretch upon a tree. See Tree, n., 3.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To drive into a tree, as a hunted animal fitted for climbing, such as animals of the cat kind, racoons, opossums, and squirrels; compel to take refuge in a tree, as a man fleeing from wolves.
  • Hence, figuratively, to deprive of the power of resistance; place at the mercy of an opponent; corner.
  • To form or shape on a tree made for the particular use: as, to tree a boot.
  • To take refuge in a tree, as a hunted animal.
  • To grow to the size of a tree.
  • To take the form of a tree, or a tree-like shape, as a metal deposited from a solution of one of its salts under the action of an electric current.
  • n. In Queensland, same as bangkal.
  • n. A perennial plant which grows from the ground with a single permanent woody self-supporting trunk or stem, ordinarily to a height of at least 25 or 30 feet.
  • n. A figure resembling a tree.
  • n. A natural figuration having more or less resemblance to a tree, assumed by or appearing on the surface of some substances under certain conditions.
  • n. In mathematics, a diagram composed of branching lines.
  • n. In electrolytic cells, a formation of tree-like groups of crystals projecting from the plates. In some forms of storage batteries these tree-formations are apt to give trouble by short-circuiting the cells.
  • n. A gallows or gibbet; especially, the cross on which Christ was crucified.
  • n. The material of a tree; wood; timber.
  • n. A piece of wood; a stick; specifically, a staff or cudgel.
  • n. In mech., one of numerous pieces or framings of wood technically so called: generally in composition, but sometimes used separately in connection with an explanatory context. For those used in vehicles, see axletree, doubletree, swingletree, whiffletree, etc.; for those in ships, chess-tree, crosstree, trestletree, etc.; for others, boot-tree, saddletree, etc.
  • n. Same as arbor-vitæ, 1.
  • n. In annt., the arbor-vitæ of the cerebellum.
  • n. Synonyms Shrub, Bush, etc. See vegetable.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. plant with trees
  • n. a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
  • n. English actor and theatrical producer noted for his lavish productions of Shakespeare (1853-1917)
  • v. force a person or an animal into a position from which he cannot escape
  • v. stretch (a shoe) on a shoetree
  • v. chase an animal up a tree
  • n. a figure that branches from a single root

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English trēow.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English tree, tre, treo, treou, trew, trow, from Old English trēo, trēow ("tree, wood, timber, beam, log, stake, stick, grove, cross, rood"), from Proto-Germanic *trewan (“tree, wood”), from pre-Germanic *dréu̯om, thematic e-grade derivative of Proto-Indo-European *dóru (“tree”). Cognate with Scots tree ("wood, rod, stick"), North Frisian tre, trä ("tree"), Middle Dutch tree ("tree"), Danish træ ("tree"), Swedish trä ("wood"), träd ("tree"), Norwegian tre ("tree"), Icelandic tré ("tree"), Gothic  (triu, "tree, wood, piece of wood"), Albanian dru ("tree, wood"), Welsh dâr ("oaks"), Ancient Greek δόρυ (dóry, "wood, spear"), Russian дерево (derevo), Tocharian A or. Related to tar, true. (Wiktionary)

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  • "Raised in the woods so he knew every tree..."
    The Ballad of Davy Crockett

    July 18, 2009

  • Little Miss Muffin, sat on a, umm ...

    July 7, 2008

  • If a tree falls in the forest where no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? If men were poached eggs (q.v.) would they need an English muffin to sit on?

    December 19, 2007