Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To disconnect: uncouple railroad cars.
  • transitive v. To set loose or release from a couple.
  • intransitive v. To come or break loose.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To disconnect or detach one thing from another.
  • v. To come loose.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To roam at liberty.
  • transitive v. To loose, as dogs, from their couples; also, to set loose; to disconnect; to disjoin.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In organ-playing, to separate or disjoin by throwing off the coupler between two keyboards which have been mechanically joined in action. See organ, 6.
  • To loose, as dogs from their couples, or railway-cars from their couplings; set loose; disjoin.
  • To break loose; exert influence unrestrained.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. disconnect or separate

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We would fix the tax code to uncouple health insurance from employment and let people purchase their own mix of services and coverage.

    The Myth of Runaway Health Spending

  • If you uncouple the gun issue from other liberal/conservative squabbles you will find that respect for our firearms bearing heritage is way broader than other issues.

    Gallup Poll Reveals Pro-Gun Trend

  • The [UnitedHealth] program is banking on the assumption that if we uncouple paying for drugs with paying for care that doctors will do what they do best, which is doctor.

    In Treating Cancer, Insurer Tries New Way to Pay Docs

  • Argument by Insignification — For any given argument where an overwhelmingly sufficient number of points of evidence is advanced to justify an assertion as to theme or subtext, and where these points of evidence are undeniably manifest in the text, a rejection of significance for each notable element of a work, large or small, recurrent or isolated, may be employed to uncouple the link between evidence and interpretation on each count.

    Arguing With Geeks 8

  • The crowd began to uncouple from their conversations, and Floyd launched his dinghy onto the dark waters of the Chateau de Ville Ballroom and Function Facilities.

    Nuptial Indemnity

  • In November, when Adafruit offered a bounty to the first person who figured out how to uncouple the Kinect from the Xbox 360, a Microsoft spokesperson told CNET: Microsoft does not condone the modification of its products.

    Microsoft announces developers kit due this spring

  • • We should be allowed to uncouple a "to" from its verb with impunity.

    Lucy Mangan: All style and substance

  • And if we occasionally want to uncouple our mental state from our actual situation in the world (e.g. by taking powerful drugs, drinking great quantities of alcohol, etc.) we don't want this to render us permanently delusional, however pleasant such delusion might be.

    Sam Harris: Toward a Science of Morality

  •            The crowd began to uncouple from their conversations, and Floyd launched his dinghy onto the dark waters of the Chateau de Ville Ballroom and Function Facilities.

    Nuptial Indemnity

  • For a moment, let us uncouple Maya Arulpragasam's third album from the media hoo-hah that's attended its release.

    MIA: Maya | CD Review

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