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Etymologies

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Examples

  • In England the initial trumpeting around Theo Walcott, the Berkshire boy, seemed to portray him as a kind of wood sprite, a rural foundling, glossy-coated and wet-nosed, ready to hare out of the tree line.

    Enjoying the fleeting thrill of fragile prodigies is a national habit | Barney Ronay

  • It's not the same fresh-faced wet-nosed crew that you used to see in those Capra propoganda films.

    StrategyPage.com

  • “For something like this,” Marrick grumbled, “it seems like upstairs would have found more to send than wet-nosed pups.”

    Hellgate London Covenant

  • When the play was improbably made into a Hollywood musical (starring 27-year-old Mickey Rooney as the wet-nosed teen) the name was changed to "Summer Holiday," but the Sloe Gin Fizzes remained.

    No Kidding, It's Good

  • Naturally, she has ingratiated herself to the household with wet-nosed, fluffy-rumped adorability ... and no one believes for a moment what a horror she is to travel with.

    November 25th, 2004

  • Also, tonight, it that wet-nosed pet of yours laughing at you?

    CNN Transcript Dec 5, 2005

  • There were many statues to Zhukov, whom Bondarenko had heard lecture when he was a wet-nosed cadet all those years before, seeing the blunt, bulldog face and ice-blue determined eyes of a killer, a true Russian hero whom politics could not demean, and whose name the Germans had come to fear.

    The Bear and the Dragon

  • Look at the sweet little girl-faces, haggard from the burden of their fat-cheeked, wet-nosed brothers.

    Fate Knocks at the Door A Novel

  • If anyone needed evidence of the frontline role played by dogs in war these days, here is the latest: The four-legged, wet-nosed troops used to sniff out mines, track down enemy fighters and clear buildings are struggling with the mental strains of combat nearly as much as their human counterparts.

    The Seattle Times

  • If anyone needed evidence of the frontline role played by dogs in war these days, here is the latest: the four-legged, wet-nosed troops used to sniff out mines, track down enemy fighters and clear buildings are struggling with the mental strains of combat nearly as much as their human counterparts.

    NYT > Home Page

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