Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A pile of wood, especially when used for fuel.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A pile of cut wood to be used as fuel.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A stack or pile of wood, especially of wood for fuel.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a pile or stack of wood to be used for fuel

Etymologies

wood +‎ pile (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • I walked in; and there in a corner on a woodpile was a real nice pair of pants, and a collar and cravat, and a coat and a tin lunch-bucket, which had been eaten -- the lunch had.

    Mary Cary "Frequently Martha"

  • The brown box sandwiched between the green-and-white EKO boiler and the woodpile is a coal burner which must have supplemented wood heat at one point.

    Bob Lewis's blog

  • Suggest that anyone at all should be looked for in the "woodpile"?

    Archive 2009-05-01

  • Pierre pointed to the scattered chips by the woodpile.

    THE GREAT INTERROGATION

  • Lon McFane leaped from the woodpile, countering him in midair.

    The Men of Forty-Mile

  • Watery veins stood out and his forehead looked like a stolen woodpile.

    Albino

  • I now have perches that I salvaged from the woodpile in my back yard.

    Archive 2009-04-01

  • They guided him gently, very gently, to the woodpile, where they put the axe in his hands.

    In a Far Country

  • He procured a packing-case from the woodpile in the cellar, fitted

    Chapter 34

  • Across the street, a few women were carrying bundles of clothing, watching the fiery woodpile with little concern.

    Peter Winter: Chasing Demons: Visiting Pol Pot's Grave

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Comments

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  • Out behind the woodpile or in some cases the wood shed is where your pa takes you to get a lickin', sometimes with a hick'ry switch. It is also the subject of a wonderful poem called The Wood-pile by Robert Frost.

    February 6, 2008