Amaryllidaceae love

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A taxonomic family within the order Asparagales — the lilies, orchids, etc.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Amaryllis +‎ -aceae

Examples

  • “A revision of Sternbergia (Amaryllidaceae) in Palestine.”

    Naomi Feinbrun-Dothan.

  • Geophyte diversity is particularly high; the lowland and montane ecoregion support about 1,500 species, most belonging to the petaloid monoct families, notably Iridaceae, Orchidaceae, Hyacinthaceae, and Amaryllidaceae.

    Lowland fynbos and renosterveld

  • The middle and lower layers include representatives of the Amaryllidaceae, sedges, and large ferns Angiopteris and Marattia, as well as climbers such as Freycinetia, Gnetum, Mucuna, Bauhinia, Piper, and Smilax.

    Seram rain forests

  • Most of the 630 species of geophytes are petaloid monocots in the families Hyacinthaceae (Lachenalia, Ornithogalum), Iridaceae (Babiana, Lapeirousia, Moraea, Romulea), Amaryllidaceae (Brunsvigia, Hessea, Strumaria) and Asphodelaceae (Bulbine, Trachyandra).

    Succulent Karoo

  • Geophyte diversity is remarkably high; the lowland and montane fynbos ecoregions support about 1,500 species, most belonging to the petaloid monocot families, notably Iridaceae, Orchidaceae, Hyacinthaceae, and Amaryllidaceae.

    Montane fynbos and renosterveld

  • Ephemers and ephemeroids are two other dominant life forms that can complete their annual life cycle during the short spring (species in the families Liliaceae and Amaryllidaceae; genera Tulipa, Ornithogalum, Gagea, Ixiolirion, and Eremurus).

    Kazakh steppe

  • (Portulacaceae) grows farther inland, forming a mosaic with species of Cyperaceae, Graminae, and Amaryllidaceae.

    Fernanda de Noronha-Atol das Rocas moist forests

  • Plant families such as Leguminosae, Amaryllidaceae and Compositae are noted for high levels of these compounds.

    Chapter 4

  • Thus, the vascular plant famines Amaryllidaceae, Meliaceae, Rubiaceae and Simaroubaceae, have been found to include plant species which are active against malaria parasites (Spencer et al., 1947), and several active compounds have been isolated from some of these plants.

    Chapter 7

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