Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A supporter of Bourbonism.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Bourbon +‎ -ist

Examples

  • The First Consul also made ruthless use of the executive clauses of the Organic Articles to remove Bourbonist bishops and to turn the ordinary clergy into State stipendiaries and educationalists; he was to find the pulpit a most useful means of disseminating propaganda to the peasantry in the years that followed.

    THE CAMPAIGNS OF NAPOLEON

  • The First Consul also made ruthless use of the executive clauses of the Organic Articles to remove Bourbonist bishops and to turn the ordinary clergy into State stipendiaries and educationalists; he was to find the pulpit a most useful means of disseminating propaganda to the peasantry in the years that followed.

    THE CAMPAIGNS OF NAPOLEON

  • Her chosen emissary was a Norman gentleman named Jacques Charles de Foulques, an ardent Bourbonist and a lieutenant-colonel in the army.

    Celebrated Claimants from Perkin Warbeck to Arthur Orton

  • 'Do you see this man?' he said to me; pointing with his spoon to the stranger; 'he is an aristocrat, a Bourbonist, a Chouan; it is the

    Complete Project Gutenberg Collection of Memoirs of Napoleon

  • On their leaflets and calendars the Italian demo-Christians printed the dilemma: "either Bourbonist or Christian-Democrats", as though to be

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 4: Clandestinity-Diocesan Chancery

  • To speak English was becoming fashionable, whereas formerly any Frenchman attempting to speak English was regarded as a Bourbonist, or an enemy to the blood-acquired liberties of his country.

    The Autobiography of Liuetenant-General Sir Harry Smith, Baronet of Aliwal on the Sutlej, G. C. B.

  • Bourbonist conspirators, a large majority of men were returned who, though described as Royalists, were in fact moderate Constitutionalists, and desired only to undo that part of the Revolution which excluded whole classes of the nation from public life.

    A History of Modern Europe, 1792-1878

  • Such were the safeguards provided against a Bourbonist reaction.

    A History of Modern Europe, 1792-1878

  • The Préfets and other civil officers appointed under the Empire still for the most part held their posts; they knew themselves to be threatened by the Bourbonist reaction, but they had not yet been displaced; their professions of loyalty to Louis

    A History of Modern Europe, 1792-1878

  • Bourbonist, turned a deaf ear to Cesar Birotteau's appeals for credit, in spite of knowing of the latter's consistent Royalism.

    Repertory of the Comedie Humaine Part 2

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