Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to Lucius Sergius Catilina (108 BC–62 BC; known in English as Catiline), Roman politician who attempted to overthrow the Roman Republic.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Catiline +‎ -ian

Examples

  • He was ever afterward a determined enemy of the great orator, and, by the aid of Pompey, Cæsar, and Crassus, finally succeeded in having him condemned for putting to death the Catilinian conspirators without due process of law.

    The Story of Rome from the Earliest Times to the End of the Republic

  • The author of this improvement in history was SALLUST, who likewise introduced the method of enlivening narrative with the occasional aid of rhetorical declamation, particularly in his account of the Catilinian conspiracy.

    The Lives of the Twelve Caesars, Volume 02: Augustus

  • The pomp and gluttony of Roman banquets have been too often described to need repetition here; neither would we be edified by learning all the orgies that Marcus Læca (an old Catilinian conspirator) and his eight guests indulged in that night: only after the dinner had been cleared, and before the Gadesian [57] dancing girls were called in, the dice began to rattle, and speedily all were engrossed in drink and play.

    A Friend of Caesar A Tale of the Fall of the Roman Republic. Time, 50-47 B.C.

  • He is a boon companion with Marcus Læca, the old Catilinian, [20] who is a smooth-headed villain, and to use a phrase of my father's good friend Cicero -- 'has his head and eyebrows always shaved, that he may not be said to have one hair of an honest man about him.'

    A Friend of Caesar A Tale of the Fall of the Roman Republic. Time, 50-47 B.C.

  • Catilinian conspiracies; and we ask you in all seriousness, why do you not enlist the Southern groggery-keepers under your black banner?

    Social relations in our Southern States,

  • Nay, it is probable that Sallust was present in the senate during the debate respecting the punishment of the Catilinian conspirators; his detail of which is agreeable to the characters of the several speakers: but in detracting, by invidious silence, or too faint representation, from the merits of Cicero on that important occasion, he exhibits a glaring instance of the partiality which too often debases the narratives of those who record the transactions of their own time.

    The Lives of the Twelve Caesars, Volume 02: Augustus

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