Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • MontCenis A mountain pass, 2,083.5 m (6,831 ft) high, in the Alps on the French-Italian border. It was long important as an invasion route.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Mont Cenis to Leghorn, where the merchant had decided to wait a favourable opportunity of passing into some part of the Turkish dominions.

    Chapter 14

  • We shall go to Genoa, Turin, and by Mont Cenis to Paris, when I shall proceed to Havre or Dieppe, and cross the channel by steam without going to London, where I have nothing to do.

    New Letters from Charles Brown to Joseph Severn

  • Saint – Gothard, nor by the Mont – Cenis, nor by the

    Albert Savarus

  • Those instructions led him to where he was now—standing next to a newsstand on the Rue du Mont Cenis in the Montmartre neighborhood of Paris.

    Consent to Kill

  • Prevented by snow from crossing the Mont Cenis, John Locke spent two winters there in the days of Charles II. (1675 – 77), and may have pondered a good many of the problems of Toleration on a soil under which the heated lava of religious strife was still unmistakeable.

    Travels through France and Italy

  • Alps, with room for the feet, and support for the back, with plenty of rugs and plenty of tobacco, used to be on the Mont Cenis, and still is on some other mountain passes, a very comfortable mode of seeing a mountain route.

    He Knew He Was Right

  • Felix conducted the fugitives through France to Lyons, and across Mont Cenis to Leghorn, where the merchant had decided to wait a favourable opportunity of passing into some part of the Turkish dominions.

    Frankenstein; Or, The Modern Prometheus

  • But most of all she is in a fret over the Mont Cenis pass, “with its steep descents and no wall at all on the outer edge!”

    The Last Great Dance on Earth

  • In spite of my assurances that I myself have crossed two times over “that fatal” Mont Cenis, she continues to be convinced that her husband will perish.

    The Last Great Dance on Earth

  • I could see the treetops of the ramparts beyond, and beyond that, in the blue horizon, the icy peaks of Mont Cenis, glittering like an enormous diamond in the sun.

    Tales of Passion, Tales of Woe

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