Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Despotism is a measure of the extent of power, with the usual connotation that it is being used inappropriately (or being wielded by someone without full ability).

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  • "Sir, I agree to this Constitution with all its faults, if they are such; because I think a general Government necessary for us, and there is no form of Government but what may be a blessing to the people if well administered, and believe farther that this is likely to be well administered for a course of years, and can only end in Despotism, as other forms have done before it, when the people shall become so corrupted as to need despotic Government, being incapable of any other." —

    Blog Post: Matt Boersma

  • Scott Horton captured the idea well in Harper's, under the rubric "The Despotism of Natural Law".

    Outlawing dissent: Rahm Emanuel's new regime | Bernard Harcourt

  • Despotism, which is of a very timorous nature, is never more secure of continuance than when it can keep men asunder; and all is influence is commonly exerted for that purpose.

    This Looks Important, Arnold Kling | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty

  • Homo Edax posted a very interesting bit on Cicero, Tacitus, and American Despotism, which is probably breaking my self-imposed "no politics on my blog" rule, but I think it's worth reading anyway, whether or not you agree.

    Breaking hiatus for a moment . . .

  • Homo Edax posted a very interesting bit on Cicero, Tacitus, and American Despotism, which is probably breaking my self-imposed "no politics on my blog" rule, but I think it's worth reading anyway, whether or not you agree.

    Archive 2006-05-01

  • Despotism, which is of a very timorous nature, is never more secure of continuance than when it can keep men asunder; and all is influence is commonly exerted for that purpose.

    democracy in America, volume 2

  • Despotism, which is of a very timorous nature, is never more secure of continuance than when it can keep men asunder; and all is influence is commonly exerted for that purpose.

    Democracy in America — Volume 2

  • [130] "In most rituals of this degree everything breathes vengeance" against religious and political "Despotism".

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • Deed of treachery; of unhallowed darkness, such as Despotism loves!

    The French Revolution

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