Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A native or inhabitant of the historical region of Flanders or of the region of Flanders in northern Belgium.
  • n. A Belgian who is a native speaker of Flemish.
  • Fleming, Sir Alexander 1881-1955. British bacteriologist who discovered penicillin in 1928, for which he shared a Nobel Prize in 1945.
  • Fleming, Ian Lancaster 1908-1964. British writer noted for his spy novels featuring the secret agent James Bond.
  • Fleming, Peggy Gale Born 1948. American figure skater who won the women's title at the U.S. championship (1964-1968), the world championship (1966-1968), and the 1968 Olympics.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A native or inhabitant of Flanders in Belgium.
  • proper n. An English surname.
  • proper n. Ian Fleming, English writer.
  • proper n. Sir Alexander Fleming, Scottish bacteriologist.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A native or inhabitant of Flanders.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A native of Flanders, an ancient countship now divided between Belgium, France, and the Netherlands; specifically, a member of the Flemish race, nearly allied to the Dutch both in blood and in language.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. Scottish bacteriologist who discovered penicillin (1881-1955)
  • n. British writer famous for writing spy novels about secret agent James Bond (1908-1964)
  • n. a native of Flanders or a Flemish-speaking Belgian

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English, from Middle Dutch Vlāming.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Middle English flameng, from late Old English Flæmingi, from Old Norse Flǽmingr, from Middle Dutch Vlaminc, Vleminc, from Old Frisian (unattested) (cf. West Frisian Flaming), from Proto-Germanic *flaumaz ‘flowing, current (water)’ and the patronymic suffix -ing ‘belonging to, descended from’. More at Flanders.

Examples

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