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Examples

  • Narrative Magazine: In spring 1992, in response to Bosnia and Herzegovina's declaration of independence from Yugoslavia, the Yugoslav National Army besieged the city of Sarajevo, the capital of the new country.

    Narrative Magazine's Friday Feature: Aggie Zivaljevic's 'Where Is My Boy?'

  • Narrative Magazine: In spring 1992, in response to Bosnia and Herzegovina's declaration of independence from Yugoslavia, the Yugoslav National Army besieged the city of Sarajevo,...

    Narrative Magazine's Friday Feature: Aggie Zivaljevic's 'Where Is My Boy?'

  • They will elect Bosnia and Herzegovina's three presidents — a Bosnian, a Serb and a Croat — and its two houses of parliament.

    Bosnian Serb Leader Damps Hopes of Post-Vote Accord

  • Bosnians on Sunday will elect three presidents to represent Bosnia and Herzegovina's three main ethnic groups — Bosnian Muslim, Bosnian Serb and Bosnian Croat.

    Corrections

  • Bosnia and Herzegovina's structure was created by the 1995 Dayton agreement that ended a 3 1/2-year war that left at least 100,000 people dead here, the largest number Bosnian Muslims.

    Bosnian Serb Leader Damps Hopes of Post-Vote Accord

  • Bosnia and HerzegovinaBosnia and Herzegovina's declaration of sovereignty in October 1991 was followed by a declaration of independence from the former Yugoslavia on 3 March 1992 after a referendum boycotted by ethnic Serbs.

    Background

  • The Dayton Peace Accords retained Bosnia and Herzegovina's international boundaries and created a joint multi-ethnic and democratic government charged with conducting foreign, diplomatic, and fiscal policy.

    Background

  • Bosnia and Herzegovinawithin Bosnia and Herzegovina's recognized borders, the country is divided into a joint Bosniak/Croat Federation (about 51% of the territory) and the Bosnian Serb-led Republika Srpska or RS (about 49% of the territory); the region called Herzegovina is contiguous to Croatia and Montenegro, and traditionally has been settled by an ethnic Croat majority in the west and an ethnic Serb majority in the east

    Geography-note

  • Geography—note: within Bosnia and Herzegovina's recognized borders, the country is divided into a joint Bosniak/Croat Federation (about 51% of the territory) and the Bosnian Serb-led Republika Srpska or RS (about 49% of the territory); the region called Herzegovina is contiguous to Croatia and Montenegro, and traditionally has been settled by an ethnic Croat majority in the west and an ethnic Serb majority in the east

    Bosnia and Herzegovina

  • Background: Bosnia and Herzegovina's declaration of sovereignty in October 1991 was followed by a declaration of independence from the former Yugoslavia on 3 March 1992 after a referendum boycotted by ethnic Serbs.

    Bosnia and Herzegovina

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