Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • Huxley, Aldous Leonard 1894-1963. British writer. His best-known work, Brave New World (1932), paints a grim picture of a scientifically organized utopia.
  • Huxley, Andrew Fielding Born 1917. British physiologist. He shared a 1963 Nobel Prize for research on nerve cells.
  • Huxley, Thomas Henry 1825-1895. British biologist who championed Darwin's theory of evolution. His works include Zoological Evidence as to Man's Place in Nature (1863) and Science and Culture (1881).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. An English habitational surname from a place in Cheshire.
  • proper n. Thomas Henry Huxley, English biologist.
  • proper n. Aldous Leonard Huxley, English writer.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. English writer; grandson of Thomas Huxley who is remembered mainly for his depiction of a scientifically controlled utopia (1894-1963)
  • n. English biologist and a leading exponent of Darwin's theory of evolution (1825-1895)
  • n. English physiologist who, with Alan Hodgkin, discovered the role of potassium and sodium ions in the transmission of the nerve impulse (born in 1917)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It is headed in bold type, PROFESSOR HUXLEY ON THE BIBLE, and, opening with the words “All who value the teaching of the Holy Bible will appreciate this wonderful description of the Bible by Professor Huxley,” proceeds to quote the eloquent passage, referred to above on p. 54, from “The School Boards, etc.”

    Thomas Henry Huxley

  • From the facts that, although natural selection had been formulated by several writers before Darwin, and had been simultaneously elaborated by Wallace and Darwin, the _Origin of Species_ was the foundation of the modern acceptation of evolution, and natural selection was the key-note of the origin of species, natural selection may be called Darwinism with both historical and scientific accuracy; and in this sense of the term Huxley was a

    Thomas Henry Huxley; A Sketch Of His Life And Work

  • From the facts that, although natural selection had been formulated by several writers before Darwin, and had been simultaneously elaborated by Wallace and Darwin, the Origin of Species was the foundation of the modern acceptation of evolution, and natural selection was the key-note of the origin of species, natural selection may be called Darwinism with both historical and scientific accuracy; and in this sense of the term Huxley was a Darwinian; a convinced but free-thinking and broad-minded Darwinian, who was far from persuaded that his tenet had a monopoly of truth, and who delighted in shewing the distinctions between what seemed to him probable and what was proved, and in absorbing from other doctrines whatever he thought worthy to be absorbed.

    Thomas Henry Huxley A Sketch Of His Life And Work

  • Perhaps a remark by Aldous Huxley is apposite here.

    Stone Pastorals: Three Men on the Side of the Horses

  • Physical science spoke in Huxley, and doubtless spoke accurately when he said, 'The soul stands related to the body as the bell of a clock to its works, and consciousness answers to the sound the bell gives out when struck.'

    In the Noon of Science

  • To cite two obvious examples, Huxley’s Brave New World (1932) and Orwell’s 1984 (1949) are political reflections on the societies around them, and in Huxley’s case it is not altogether clear whether he is entirely critical of the world that he describes.

    Ballardian » A Near Future: Nic Clear’s Tribute to JG Ballard

  • I forget in which novel it appeared, but I recall a Huxley character referring to the God of the Old Testament as “the gaseous vertebrate.”

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Aldous Huxley:

  • Mr. Huxley is quoted as saying “Facts do not cease to exist simply because they are ingored.”

    Think Progress » Lynne Cheney Unhinged: Insists Her Husband Never Connected Saddam to 9/11

  • Mrs. Huxley is a Justice of the Peace, and is active in a variety of public work in Cambridgeshire.

    Andrew F. Huxley - Biography

  • The inner root sheath consists of (1) a delicate cuticle next the hair, composed of a single layer of imbricated scales with atrophied nuclei; (2) one or two layers of horny, flattened, nucleated cells, known as Huxley’s layer; and (3) a single layer of cubical cells with clear flattened nuclei, called Henle’s layer.

    X. The Organs of the Senses and the Common Integument. 2. The Common Integument

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