Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • Silone, Ignazio 1900-1978. Italian novelist whose best-known works, Bread and Wine (1937) and The Seed Beneath the Snow (1941), were written while he was in exile from the Fascist regime in Italy.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • He is one of the greatest of twentieth-century political novelists, and his work more than holds its own — I'd even say overshadows — that of contemporaries like Andre Malraux and Ignazio Silone, not to mention such fading Cold War relics as 1984 and Darkness at Noon.

    A Different Stripe:

  • Eighteen years later, his posthumous reputation suffered a blow: An Italian historian disclosed that when Silone was still a Communist, he had engaged in a sustained correspondence with a high-ranking fascist police official.

    Proletariat? No. Peasants? Sì.

  • "Fontamara" ( "Bitter Spring"), a powerful anti-fascist novel published in 1933, was set among the suffering peasants of the Abruzzo region of southern Italy -- the first appearance, Silone believed, of "peasants of flesh and blood" in Italian literature.

    Proletariat? No. Peasants? Sì.

  • In 1944, with Benito Mussolini and the fascists no longer in power, Silone finally returned to his homeland.

    Proletariat? No. Peasants? Sì.

  • Though Silone was against the Catholic Church, Greene observed, his voice, as he wrote of one of his characters, was "'that of a disappointed lover.'"

    Proletariat? No. Peasants? Sì.

  • Next to the Hungarian novelist and ex-Communist Arthur Koestler, Silone was the most prominent figure at the founding conference of the anticommunist Congress for Cultural Freedom in Berlin in 1950.

    Proletariat? No. Peasants? Sì.

  • "From there," Stanislao G. Pugliese writes in his thoroughly researched and judiciously sympathetic biography, "Bitter Spring," "Silone worked with Allen Dulles of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS, the forerunner of the CIA) in coordinating assistance to the anti-Fascist Resistance working within Italy."

    Proletariat? No. Peasants? Sì.

  • Had Silone been spying on the Communists for the fascists?

    Proletariat? No. Peasants? Sì.

  • Stalin suspended the session so that a Bulgarian delegate could let Silone in on the party's "internal situation" -- that a power struggle was going on and no one cared what the document said.

    Proletariat? No. Peasants? Sì.

  • Silone persisted: "We must see the document concerned."

    Proletariat? No. Peasants? Sì.

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