Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to Alexis de Tocqueville, or characteristic of his democratic ideals

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Quite apart from the clear stipulations of the First Amendment, this seems to me to violate the Tocquevillian principle that American religion is strictly based on the voluntary principle and neither requires nor deserves any taxpayer-funded endorsement.

    Forced Merriment: The True Spirit of Christmas

  • Or is it an American spirit of optimism wedded, if you will, to a Tocquevillian spirit of restlessness that inspires three out of four Americans to say they believe marriage is for life, while only one in four agreed with the notion that even if a marriage is unhappy, one should stay put for the sake of the children.

    Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off

  • Their aim is democratic consensus, but they produce either paralysis or a Tocquevillian conformity, the crowd triumphant.

    Robert Teitelman: Kay on Havel, Orwell and the Greengrocer

  • This is Tocquevillian, in the idea that the coercive power of government is helpful in solving free-rider problems of voluntary organizations.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Muzzy v. Wilkins

  • Via The Tocquevillian Magazine, here's a patriotic young lady:

    Archive 2007-04-01

  • "Screw the state" is not a Tocquevillian formulation, but he would have certainly agreed with the latter sentiment.

    The State Despotic

  • "It should be pretty clear that I think the upper portion of a balanced federal bi-cameral legislature is nothing more than an aristocratic/plutocratic corpse dressed up post hoc in Tocquevillian language that obscures the fact that provinces and states, almost by virtue of their very existence, have more than enough power to fend off the 'Tyranny of the majority.'"

    Adding seats to Commons, feds should reform senate too

  • It should be pretty clear that I think the upper portion of a balanced federal bi-cameral legislature is nothing more than an aristocratic/plutocratic corpse dressed up post hoc in Tocquevillian language that obscures the fact that provinces and states, almost by virtue of their very existence, have more than enough power to fend off the “Tyranny of the majority.”

    Adding seats to Commons, feds should reform senate too

  • I remember — since it gives me hope for a quick resolution — the story of my good Tocquevillian cop back at the start of my journey, on the highway.

    In the Footsteps of Tocqueville (Part V)

  • A Tocquevillian revolution extolling certainly not atheism but secularism, and maintaining the separation of church and state.

    In the Footsteps of Tocqueville (Part V)

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.